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NEW ZEALAND photos, articles, human interest stories, fun or interesting.

This topic contains 1806 replies, has 26 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of supergold supergold > 7 days ago.

Discussions News & Current Affairs (excluding Politics) NEW ZEALAND photos, articles, human interest stories, fun or interesting.

Viewing 10 posts - 1,421 through 1,430 (of 1,807 total)
  • #1676504
    Profile photo of vale019vale019
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    vale019

    New Zealand Firsts – tbc

    New Zealand’s first lighthouse lit – 1 January 1859

    Pencarrow Head lighthouse, near Wellington Harbour, was lit for the first time amid great celebration. After years of inadequate solutions, Wellington finally had a permanent lighthouse – a New Zealand first. Equally notable was the lighthouse’s first keeper, Mary Bennett, who had looked after Pencarrow’s temporary light since her husband’s death in 1855 – she remains New Zealand’s only female lighthouse keeper.

    During the day, many settlers visited their new lighthouse on the SS Wonga Wonga. The 10 a.m. excursion carried about 65 people. The afternoon excursion, which left at 4 p.m., was much more crowded.

    When the Wonga Wonga anchored off Pencarrow about 7 p.m. nearly 40 people, including officials, went ashore and walked up to the lighthouse, where engineer Edward Wright gave a tour.

    Wellington’s provincial superintendent, Isaac Featherston, had the honour of lighting the light for the first time. Although those on the Wonga Wonga were initially concerned at the apparent inefficiency of the light, their disappointment soon gave way to pleasure as a brilliant light came into view.

    1-pencarrow-lighhouse-lit-01
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    First passengers traverse Lyttelton rail tunnel – 9 December 1867

    After 6½ years of construction, it took just 6½ minutes for the first trainload of passengers to speed through the 2.6- km tunnel linking the Canterbury plains to the port of Lyttelton.

    Canterbury Provincial Superintendent William Moorhouse (‘Railway Billy’) had proposed this ambitious project as early as 1858. In July 1861, amid much fanfare, he ceremonially ‘turned the first sod’, but the task proved challenging. The first firm contracted to do the work withdrew. The hardness of the volcanic rock and the need to work out ways of ventilating and draining the tunnel all resulted in delays.

    Provincial Engineer Edward Dobson oversaw the work, and his skill was demonstrated when the Lyttelton and Heathcote ends met perfectly in May 1867. Several weeks later, the tunnel was opened to the people of Lyttelton and Christchurch for a day, and hundreds walked its length.

    Temporary rails were laid to enable the passage of the first locomotive on 18 November. The first goods train followed a week later, with passenger services beginning on 9 December.

    2-dec-09-1867-lyttelton-tunnel-02
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    Tongariro mountains gifted to Crown – 23 September 1887

    In February 1887 newspapers reported Ngāti Tūwharetoa’s proposal to gift the British Crown the mountaintops of Tongariro, Ngāuruhoe and Ruapehu to form the basis of a national park.

    The initiative reflected Ngāti Tūwharetoa’s ongoing concern for its sacred mountains. During the 1880s various claimants were seeking land around Lake Taupō. Because Tūwharetoa chief Horonuku had joined both Waikato and Te Kooti in fighting against the Crown, some claimants believed the Crown would treat the Taupō blocks as rebel land. Horonuku could see that he might lose the land. On the advice of his son-in-law, the politician Lawrence Marshall Grace, he gifted the mountain block to the government to ensure that it could never be sold.

    The gift of 6518 acres (2638 ha) became the nucleus of the proposed Tongariro National Park – New Zealand’s first and the fourth in the world. Over the next 20 years, the government sought further land with which to establish the park. Official confirmation appeared in the New Zealand Gazette in 1907, when sufficient land was in Crown title.

    3-tuwharetoa-chief-horonuku-te-heuheu-tukini-IV-sept-23-1887-tongariro-national-park-03

     

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    #1676757
    Profile photo of vale019vale019
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    vale019

    More Firsts for NZ  (tbc)

    New Zealand Natives team plays first game in UK – 3 October 1888

    The privately organised rugby team was the first to wear the silver fern and an all-black uniform. Originally called New Zealand Maori, their name was changed after organiser and captain Joe Warbrick (Ngāti Rangitihi) and promoter Thomas Eyton added five Pākehā to strengthen the team. The 26-man squad included six former students of Te Aute College, five Warbrick brothers, and future All Black captain Thomas Ellison.

    During a marathon 15-month tour of New Zealand, Australia and the United Kingdom, the Natives played 107 rugby matches – winning 78 – and another 11 under Australian rules.

    The team disembarked in London on 27 September after a six-week voyage from Australia. Six days later, they efficiently defeated a scratch Surrey XV 4–1.

    The enterprise had echoes of the Aboriginal cricket tour of 1868, but apart from performing haka before matches, the Māori proved relatively unexotic. They beat Ireland, but lost to Wales and England as fatigue set in.

    The main legacies of the tour were Ellison’s invention of the disruptive wing forward position and the adoption of more structured back play.

    1-oct-03-1888-natives-team-uk-01

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    Sutherland Falls climbed – 9 March 1890

    Young surveyor William Quill needed only basic climbing equipment, including a billhook and an alpenstock, to scale the side of the ‘great Sutherland waterfall’ which cascades for 580 m near Milford Sound.

    The toughest stretch of his 3½-hour climb was the highest of the three sections of the falls, where, he wrote to the chief surveyor, ‘the least slip would send me down the perpendicular rock to be dashed to pieces hundreds of feet below’.

    Quill’s reward was to stand ‘at the summit of the highest waterfall in the world’ taking in an ‘indescribably magnificent’ view. The cirque lake which fed the falls would be named Lake Quill in his honour. Before climbing back down the cliff-face (in 2½ hours) he planted a flag bearing his name and the date ‘as near to the top of the falls as there was holding ground’. It is unclear whether anyone has repeated this ascent – Lake Quill can be reached with much less risk from McKinnon Pass on the Milford Track.

    William Quill’s luck ran out less than a year later. After planting a flag on top of the Homer Saddle, the 25-year-old set off from a survey camp alone on 15 January in an attempt to reach Milford via the nearby Gertrude Saddle. He never arrived. After an arduous five-week search on both sides of the main divide, William’s two younger brothers found fragments of his skull at the bottom of a 600-m-high cliff. He had moved too close to the edge while admiring another alpine vista.

    Professor Mainwaring Brown of the University of Otago had died in similar circumstances in 1888. Quill’s death was a catalyst for the formation on 11 March 1891 of a New Zealand Alpine Club ‘to assist inexperienced climbers, and spread a little knowledge of the dangers that are to be met with in mountain climbing’. This gentlemen’s club went into recess five years later but was revived around 1914 and still exists in a much more egalitarian and less gendered form.

    A memorial to William Quill was erected on the Gertrude Saddle in 1932.

    2-march-09-1890-sutherland-falls-02

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    First Labour Day celebrations – 28 October 1890

    The first Labour Day celebrated the struggle for an eight-hour working day. Parades in the main centres were attended by several thousand trade union members and supporters.

    New Zealand workers were among the first in the world to claim the right to an eight-hour day. As early as 1840 the carpenter Samuel Parnell famously won an eight-hour day in Wellington. The provision was soon extended to other centres, but it was a custom, not a legal entitlement, and only applied to some groups of workers. The establishment of Labour Day reflected the growing influence of New Zealand’s trade union movement in the 1880s and its efforts to improve employment conditions for all workers.

    Labour Day was first celebrated in New Zealand on 28 October 1890, marking 50 years since Parnell’s achievement and the first anniversary of the formation of the Maritime Council, an umbrella organisation of transport and mining unions, in 1889. The event was held during the dying days of the ill-fated trans-Tasman Maritime Strike, and several thousand trade union members and supporters attended parades in the main centres; a highlight of the Wellington event was an appearance by the elderly Parnell himself. Government employees were given the day off to attend the parades.

    In 1899 Parliament legislated to make Labour Day a public holiday. Predating both Anzac Day and Waitangi Day, it was the first public holiday in New Zealand not associated with religion, royal birthdays or anniversaries of provincial settlement. Since 1910 Labour Day has been held on the fourth Monday in October.

    3-oct-28-1890-first-labour-day-03

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    #1676779
    Profile photo of vale019vale019
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    vale019

    How to talk like a New Zealander. (From the Backpacker Guide. NZ)

    [Sheeeze, mate, I reckon I must be getting a bit long in the tooth, eh? I don’t talk like this – what about you, bro?)

    Once you leave the hostels, chances are you will bump into a Kiwi – not the bird but a person from New Zealand. See, confusing already, eh? Use our guide to help you through the territory of Kiwi lingo and slang. By the end of your gap year or working holiday in New Zealand, the words like slipping on your “jandals”, popping to the “dairy”, and buying some beer for the “chilly bin” will slip out of your mouth from time to time. Yet, it will completely make sense!

    Step it up a notch by learning some basic te reo Maori, so you can pronounce all those Maori place names in New Zealand.
    ============================================================================

    Kiwi

    “Kiwi” is a person from New Zealand. Many Kiwis refer to themselves as Kiwis so it is popular belief that they do not take offense if called a “Kiwi”. Kiwi is also a native bird of New Zealand and is not to be mistaken as the word for “kiwifruit”. Speaking of kiwifruit, did you know that a popular backpacker job is kiwifruit picking?

    Eh?

    Pronounced “ay”, eh is added to the end of a statement for a reply of confirmation or at the end of a rhetorical question. Basically, it is stuck on the end of some sentences unnecessarily and Kiwis are just really fond of saying “eh?” Be warned, it is a contagious New Zealand colloquialism, and chances are you will find yourself saying it.

    Sweet as

    Sweet as… what? Nope, just “sweet as” meaning cool, awesome, I am delighted with what you are proposing. It is often combined with the word…

    Bro

    Bro is short for brother from another mother.

    Kia Ora

    Pronounced “key-or-a”, Kia Ora is a Maori word meaning good health but used as a greeting.

    Maori

    Referring to the aboriginal New Zealanders and their language.

    Aotearoa

    The Maori word for New Zealand.

    Jandals

    Flip-flops. Japanese sandals = jandals.

    Tramping

    Hiking

    Togs

    Swimwear

    Wop-wops

    There are many wop-wops in New Zealand, meaning a place far from other civilisation. Wop-wop is a funny word… Anyway…

    Tiki Tour

    Taking the scenic route.

    Knackered

    Not just tired, but really tired.

    Hangi

    Cooking in an underground oven, which is a Maori tradition and makes food taste incredible. Expect to taste this with a Maori cultural experience.

    Haka

    An awesome war dance performed by the Maori and used by national sports teams.

    All Blacks

    New Zealand’s national rugby team.

    Gawk

    Stare

    She’ll be right

    We don’t know who “she” is, but it means “it will be Ok”.

    No worries

    Not a problem.

    Chur bro

    Kind of like “Cheers, bro” or “Thanks, bro”.

    Chilly bin

    A chilly bin is a cool box to you and me. Although the word “bin” is uttered, do not mistake a chilly bin as something to put rubbish/trash in. What is usually contained in a chilly bin is very precious.

    Dairy

    This is another word for a convenience store. “I’m going to the dairy, do you want anything, bro?”

    #1676831
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    kai

    Some beauties about Kiwi speech there Val . Might C&P tomorrow if thats OK???

    Just come on for a few mins while watching Highlanders/v The blues ,,,

    so will catch up properly tomorrow sometime ….

     

    Bill✔️ Castle Hill New Zealand. This is an area adjacent to the Arthur's Pass road, South Island, New Zealand. See the rocky skyline! Also the name of a large and well-known sheep station in the area. In 2007 It was bought and operated by Christine Fernyhough, a recently widowed Auckland socialite. She made a wonderful job of learning and running the high country station. She developed it, and sold in 2014. Bill Gibson-Patmore. (curation & caption: @BillGP). Bill✔️

    Castle Hill is a location and a high country station in New Zealand’s South Island. It is located at an altitude of 700 metres.

    The hill was  named because of the imposing array of limestone boulders in the area reminiscent of an old, run-down stone castle.

    Cheers From Kai

    • This reply was modified 12 months ago by Profile photo of kai kai.
    #1676833
    Profile photo of vale019vale019
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    vale019

    Fab pic, Kai – so many great things to see if these tiny islands of ours 🙂

    Just copy whatever & whenever you want, Kai, fine by me 🙂

    #1676841
    Profile photo of kaikai
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    kai

    Thanks so much Val,,, will email you tomorrow,, Take care

    Cheers From Kai

    #1676866
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    Anonymous

    Great shots Kai.  Sure are massive size stones.

    #1676891
    Profile photo of kaikai
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    kai

    Thanks J ,,must go there on our next Tiki Tour,, They look awesome..

    Cheers From Kai

    #1676996
    Profile photo of vale019vale019
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    vale019

    Flying Taxis Secretly Tested In New Zealand

    Silicon Valley-based flying car start-up “Kitty Hawk, backed by Google founder Larry Page, has been secretly testing an electric autonomous aircraft for several months in New Zealand, the company revealed on Tuesday.” Tim Bradshaw and Jamie Smyth report for The Financial Times.

    “Jacinda Ardern, New Zealand’s prime minister, unveiled the venture on Tuesday alongside Fred Reid, chief executive of Zephyr Airworks, Kitty Hawk’s operator in the country.”

    “Cora rises like a helicopter and flies like a plane, eliminating the need for a runway and creating the possibility of taking off from places like rooftops,” the company said on its website.

    “Cora will use self-flying software combined with human oversight to make flying possible for people without training.”

    Flying Taxis Secretly Tested In New Zealand

    “Led by Sebastian Thrun, who is also a founder of Google’s self-driving car programme and online education service Udacity, Kitty Hawk operated largely in secret until April 2017, when it unveiled a prototype of its Flyer — a single-person ultralight aircraft powered by eight electric rotors.”

    While The Flyer is designed to be used only over water and sold to private individuals, “Cora is a more ambitious vehicle, with 12 independent rotors capable of carrying two people at heights of between 150 metres and 900 metres.”

    “Kitty Hawk’s mission is to completely change the way we get around. We succeed if everyone chooses to fly every day,” said Thrun. “With our prototype air taxi Cora, we are applying eight years of research and development into an entirely new way to commute.”

    “Kitty Hawk envisages eventually operating a service “similar to an airline or a rideshare”. The company has received an “experimental airworthiness certificate” for Cora in New Zealand and the US,” reports the article.

    “I’m really thrilled to see New Zealand endorsed as a place where exciting companies want to do business,” said New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern.

    “Innovation is in our DNA — Kiwis love a challenge and pushing the envelope and I think it’s that spirit that resonates with innovators around the world.”

    #1676998
    Profile photo of vale019vale019
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    vale019

    Jacinda Ardern’s Favourite Kiwi Hangouts

    “At just 37 years of age, New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is the world’s youngest female Head of Government.” Vacations & Travel Magazine spoke to Ardern about her favourite spots in Auckland and Wellington as well as her favourite Kiwi escapes.”

    Local favourites of the Prime Minister include the Twisted Tomato or Mint Cakery – or “anything within walking distance.” In Wellington “proximity is also key” for Ardern, which means the “work caf, Bellamys by Logan Brown, wins most of the time.”

    When asked about her favourite weekend escape, Ardern said:

    “Spending time with family or heading out on the boat with my partner Clarke is a treat – but then again, so is the occasional weekend at home!”

    Jacinda Ardern’s Favourite Kiwi Hangouts

    “Take a ferry across the harbour and stroll the streets of charming Devonport, climb to the top of iconic Rangitoto Island’s volcanic slope, sip your way around Waiheke – the island of wine, or get your wildlife thrills on a Whale & Dolphin Safari.”

    Hot Water Beach on the Coromandel Peninsula and Mount Maunganui or Mauao (also known as The Mount) are some of the Prime Minister’s must-do Kiwi family experiences she is looking forward to sharing with her own little one.

    “Anything that involves the sea and sand,” she said.

    “We would always head to the beach over summer, so that’s probably the simple thing I am looking forward to the most.”

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