Changing Times: New Zealand since 1945

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Changing times: New Zealand Since 1945

Most history books are about people who have been and gone. But “Changing Times, New Zealand Since 1945,” starts in the year when the first baby boomers were born and traces the often turbulent changes in their lives as far as 2012. It was written by historians Jenny Carlyon and Diana Morrow.

They describe how during this time New Zealand changed dramatically from “a post-war society famous for dull conformity to one of the most ethnically, economically and socially diverse nations on earth”.

After the turbulent war years government policies were designed to keep women at home raising the kids and filling the tins while the men were the breadwinners.

But the Baby boomers, who were born after the war, had different ideas. Influenced by American popular culture they wanted to be free and to have fun. Along came bodgies and widgies and rock’nroll.

Many became involved in social issues such as feminism, gay rights, the Vietnam War, the Springbok Tour and a Nuclear Free New Zealand. 

Then post 1984, the government imposed a free-market revolution with “little or no regard for the general will of the electorate or the effects on the social and economic lives of numerous New Zealanders”. 

While acknowledging that this caused a great deal of hardship, the authors also think that “the reforms have made the New Zealand of 2013 a more diverse, dynamic, varied society with choices and opportunities that did not exist in 1984”.

The photographs in this book are an important part of the story and quite a few baby boomers may well discover a picture of themselves in their younger years. There are also some extraordinary pictures of public figures. Mabel Howard New Zealand’s first female cabinet minister is shown jiving with rock’n roll star Johnny Devlin in Christchurch in 1959. Sir Edmund Hillary and radio personality Selwyn Toogood are snapped giving away samples of ‘Rinso’ during the opening of the Lambton Quay Self Help Store. Rugby Legends Don (“the Boot”) Clarke and Bob Scott are caught in a kicking contest at Athletic Park in 1966 with Scott kicking barefoot.

Although most of the book is positive about the changes that were achieved until the present time, it also left me with a feeling of some unease about our future. For example, the authors reference a recent OECD report which shows that in fact New Zealand’s once relatively narrow income gap is widening faster than any other country in the developed world.

One notable omission in this book is the way modern technology has changed our lives. But on the whole, I thought it was a meticulously researched and balanced account which covered most aspects of our recent social and political history. It has allowed the voices of many New Zealanders from different points of view to be heard.  

Changing Times New Zealand Since 1945 by Jenny Carlyon and Diana Morrow is published by Auckland University Press, RRP $45 

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Most history books are about people who have been and gone. But “Changing Times, New Zealand Since 1945,” starts in the year when the first baby boomers were born and traces the often turbulent changes in their lives as far as 2012. It was written by historians Jenny Carlyon and Diana Morrow.

They describe how during this time New Zealand changed dramatically from “a post-war society famous for dull conformity to one of the most ethnically, economically and socially diverse nations on earth”.

After the turbulent war years government policies were designed to keep women at home raising the kids and filling the tins while the men were the breadwinners.

But the Baby boomers, who were born after the war, had different ideas. Influenced by American popular culture they wanted to be free and to have fun. Along came bodgies and widgies and rock’nroll.

Many became involved in social issues such as feminism, gay rights, the Vietnam War, the Springbok Tour and a Nuclear Free New Zealand. 

Then post 1984, the government imposed a free-market revolution with “little or no regard for the general will of the electorate or the effects on the social and economic lives of numerous New Zealanders”. 

While acknowledging that this caused a great deal of hardship, the authors also think that “the reforms have made the New Zealand of 2013 a more diverse, dynamic, varied society with choices and opportunities that did not exist in 1984”.

The photographs in this book are an important part of the story and quite a few baby boomers may well discover a picture of themselves in their younger years. There are also some extraordinary pictures of public figures. Mabel Howard New Zealand’s first female cabinet minister is shown jiving with rock’n roll star Johnny Devlin in Christchurch in 1959. Sir Edmund Hillary and radio personality Selwyn Toogood are snapped giving away samples of ‘Rinso’ during the opening of the Lambton Quay Self Help Store. Rugby Legends Don (“the Boot”) Clarke and Bob Scott are caught in a kicking contest at Athletic Park in 1966 with Scott kicking barefoot.

Although most of the book is positive about the changes that were achieved until the present time, it also left me with a feeling of some unease about our future. For example, the authors reference a recent OECD report which shows that in fact New Zealand’s once relatively narrow income gap is widening faster than any other country in the developed world.

One notable omission in this book is the way modern technology has changed our lives. But on the whole, I thought it was a meticulously researched and balanced account which covered most aspects of our recent social and political history. It has allowed the voices of many New Zealanders from different points of view to be heard.  

Changing Times New Zealand Since 1945 by Jenny Carlyon and Diana Morrow is published by Auckland University Press, RRP $45 

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They describe how during this time New Zealand changed dramatically from “a post-war society famous for dull conformity to one of the most ethnically, economically and socially diverse nations on earth”.

After the turbulent war years government policies were designed to keep women at home raising the kids and filling the tins while the men were the breadwinners.

But the Baby boomers, who were born after the war, had different ideas. Influenced by American popular culture they wanted to be free and to have fun. Along came bodgies and widgies and rock’nroll.

Many became involved in social issues such as feminism, gay rights, the Vietnam War, the Springbok Tour and a Nuclear Free New Zealand. 

Then post 1984, the government imposed a free-market revolution with “little or no regard for the general will of the electorate or the effects on the social and economic lives of numerous New Zealanders”. 

While acknowledging that this caused a great deal of hardship, the authors also think that “the reforms have made the New Zealand of 2013 a more diverse, dynamic, varied society with choices and opportunities that did not exist in 1984”.

The photographs in this book are an important part of the story and quite a few baby boomers may well discover a picture of themselves in their younger years. There are also some extraordinary pictures of public figures. Mabel Howard New Zealand’s first female cabinet minister is shown jiving with rock’n roll star Johnny Devlin in Christchurch in 1959. Sir Edmund Hillary and radio personality Selwyn Toogood are snapped giving away samples of ‘Rinso’ during the opening of the Lambton Quay Self Help Store. Rugby Legends Don (“the Boot”) Clarke and Bob Scott are caught in a kicking contest at Athletic Park in 1966 with Scott kicking barefoot.

Although most of the book is positive about the changes that were achieved until the present time, it also left me with a feeling of some unease about our future. For example, the authors reference a recent OECD report which shows that in fact New Zealand’s once relatively narrow income gap is widening faster than any other country in the developed world.

One notable omission in this book is the way modern technology has changed our lives. But on the whole, I thought it was a meticulously researched and balanced account which covered most aspects of our recent social and political history. It has allowed the voices of many New Zealanders from different points of view to be heard.  

Changing Times New Zealand Since 1945 by Jenny Carlyon and Diana Morrow is published by Auckland University Press, RRP $45 

.

Changing times: New Zealand Since 1945

Most history books are about people who have been and gone. But “Changing Times, New Zealand Since 1945,” starts in the year when the first baby boomers were born and traces the often turbulent changes in their lives as far as 2012. It was written by historians Jenny Carlyon and Diana Morrow.

They describe how during this time New Zealand changed dramatically from “a post-war society famous for dull conformity to one of the most ethnically, economically and socially diverse nations on earth”.

After the turbulent war years government policies were designed to keep women at home raising the kids and filling the tins while the men were the breadwinners.

But the Baby boomers, who were born after the war, had different ideas. Influenced by American popular culture they wanted to be free and to have fun. Along came bodgies and widgies and rock’nroll.

Many became involved in social issues such as feminism, gay rights, the Vietnam War, the Springbok Tour and a Nuclear Free New Zealand. 

Then post 1984, the government imposed a free-market revolution with “little or no regard for the general will of the electorate or the effects on the social and economic lives of numerous New Zealanders”. 

While acknowledging that this caused a great deal of hardship, the authors also think that “the reforms have made the New Zealand of 2013 a more diverse, dynamic, varied society with choices and opportunities that did not exist in 1984”.

The photographs in this book are an important part of the story and quite a few baby boomers may well discover a picture of themselves in their younger years. There are also some extraordinary pictures of public figures. Mabel Howard New Zealand’s first female cabinet minister is shown jiving with rock’n roll star Johnny Devlin in Christchurch in 1959. Sir Edmund Hillary and radio personality Selwyn Toogood are snapped giving away samples of ‘Rinso’ during the opening of the Lambton Quay Self Help Store. Rugby Legends Don (“the Boot”) Clarke and Bob Scott are caught in a kicking contest at Athletic Park in 1966 with Scott kicking barefoot.

Although most of the book is positive about the changes that were achieved until the present time, it also left me with a feeling of some unease about our future. For example, the authors reference a recent OECD report which shows that in fact New Zealand’s once relatively narrow income gap is widening faster than any other country in the developed world.

One notable omission in this book is the way modern technology has changed our lives. But on the whole, I thought it was a meticulously researched and balanced account which covered most aspects of our recent social and political history. It has allowed the voices of many New Zealanders from different points of view to be heard.  

Changing Times New Zealand Since 1945 by Jenny Carlyon and Diana Morrow is published by Auckland University Press, RRP $45 

.

Changing times: New Zealand Since 1945

Most history books are about people who have been and gone. But “Changing Times, New Zealand Since 1945,” starts in the year when the first baby boomers were born and traces the often turbulent changes in their lives as far as 2012. It was written by historians Jenny Carlyon and Diana Morrow.

They describe how during this time New Zealand changed dramatically from “a post-war society famous for dull conformity to one of the most ethnically, economically and socially diverse nations on earth”.

After the turbulent war years government policies were designed to keep women at home raising the kids and filling the tins while the men were the breadwinners.

But the Baby boomers, who were born after the war, had different ideas. Influenced by American popular culture they wanted to be free and to have fun. Along came bodgies and widgies and rock’nroll.

Many became involved in social issues such as feminism, gay rights, the Vietnam War, the Springbok Tour and a Nuclear Free New Zealand. 

Then post 1984, the government imposed a free-market revolution with “little or no regard for the general will of the electorate or the effects on the social and economic lives of numerous New Zealanders”. 

While acknowledging that this caused a great deal of hardship, the authors also think that “the reforms have made the New Zealand of 2013 a more diverse, dynamic, varied society with choices and opportunities that did not exist in 1984”.

The photographs in this book are an important part of the story and quite a few baby boomers may well discover a picture of themselves in their younger years. There are also some extraordinary pictures of public figures. Mabel Howard New Zealand’s first female cabinet minister is shown jiving with rock’n roll star Johnny Devlin in Christchurch in 1959. Sir Edmund Hillary and radio personality Selwyn Toogood are snapped giving away samples of ‘Rinso’ during the opening of the Lambton Quay Self Help Store. Rugby Legends Don (“the Boot”) Clarke and Bob Scott are caught in a kicking contest at Athletic Park in 1966 with Scott kicking barefoot.

Although most of the book is positive about the changes that were achieved until the present time, it also left me with a feeling of some unease about our future. For example, the authors reference a recent OECD report which shows that in fact New Zealand’s once relatively narrow income gap is widening faster than any other country in the developed world.

One notable omission in this book is the way modern technology has changed our lives. But on the whole, I thought it was a meticulously researched and balanced account which covered most aspects of our recent social and political history. It has allowed the voices of many New Zealanders from different points of view to be heard.  

Changing Times New Zealand Since 1945 by Jenny Carlyon and Diana Morrow is published by Auckland University Press, RRP $45 

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