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WOW! This gives you something to think about!

This topic contains 450 replies, has 37 voices, and was last updated by  Hero42 7 hours, 50 minutes ago.

Discussions News & Current Affairs (excluding Politics) WOW! This gives you something to think about!

Viewing 10 posts - 211 through 220 (of 451 total)
  • #1729352
    supergold
    Member
    Member since: May 9, 2009
    Topics: 65
    Replies: 9180
    supergold

    A few weeks ago, I was shuffling toward the garage with a steaming cup of coffee in one hand and the morning paper in the other. What began as a typical Saturday morning turned into one of those lessons that life seems to hand you from time to time. Let me tell you about it:

    I turned the dial up into the phone portion of the band on my ham radio in order to listen to a Saturday morning swap net.

    Along the way, I came across an older sounding chap, with a tremendous signal and a golden voice. You know the kind; he sounded like he should be in the broadcasting business. He was telling whom-ever he was talking with something about “a thousand marbles. ” I was intrigued and stopped to listen to what he had to say

    “Well, Tom, it sure sounds like you’re busy with your job. I’m sure they pay you well but it’s a shame you have to be away from home and your family so much. Hard to believe a young fellow should have to work sixty or seventy hours a week to make ends meet. It’s too bad you missed your daughter’s “dance recital” he continued; “Let me tell you something that has helped me keep my own priorities.” And that’s when he began to explain his theory of a “thousand marbles”.

    “You see, I sat down one day and did a little arithmetic. The average person lives about seventy-five years. I know, some live more and some live less, but on average, folks live about seventy-five years.

    “Now then, I multiplied 75 times 52 and I came up with 3900, which is the number of Saturdays that the average person has in their entire lifetime. Now, stick with me, Tom, I’m getting to the important part.

    It took me until I was fifty-five years old to think about all this in any detail”, he went on, “and by that time I had lived through over twenty-eight hundred Saturdays. I got to thinking that if I lived to be seventy-five, I only had about a thousand of them left to enjoy. So I went to a toy store and bought every single marble they had. I ended up having to visit three toy stores to round up 1000 marbles I took them home and put them inside a large, clear plastic container right here in the shack next to my gear.”

    “Every Saturday since then, I have taken one marble out and thrown it away. I found that by watching the marbles diminish, I focused more on the really important things in life.
    There’s nothing like watching your time here on this earth run out to help get your priorities straight.”

    marbles

    “Now let me tell you one last thing before I sign-off with you and take my lovely wife out for breakfast. This morning, I took the very last marble out of the container. I figure that if I make it until next Saturday then I have been given a little extra time. And the one thing we can all use is a little more time.”

    “It was nice to meet you Tom, I hope you spend more time with your family, and I hope to meet you again here on the band. This is a 75 Year old Man, K9NZQ, clear and going QRT, good morning!”

    You could have heard a pin drop on the band when this fellow signed off. I guess he gave us all a lot to think about. I had planned to work on the antenna that morning, and then I was going to meet up with a few hams to work on the next club newsletter.

    Instead, I went upstairs and woke my wife up with a kiss. “C’mon honey, I’m taking you and the kids to breakfast.” “What brought this on?” she asked with a smile. “Oh, nothing special, it’s just been a long time since we spent a Saturday together with the kids. And hey, can we stop at a toy store while we’re out? I need to buy some marbles.”

    Supergold-Wainuiomata (Wellington)

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    #1730515
    supergold
    Member
    Member since: May 9, 2009
    Topics: 65
    Replies: 9180
    supergold

    I’m not sure if I have posted this before but I feel it is well worthwhile posting again.

    The telephone rang. It was a call from his mother. He answered it and his mother told him, “Mr. Belser died last night. The funeral is Wednesday.”

    Memories flashed through his mind like an old newsreel as he sat quietly remembering his childhood days.

    “Jack, did you hear me?”

    “Oh, sorry, Mom. Yes, I heard you. It’s been so long since I thought of him. I’m sorry, but I honestly thought he died years ago,” Jack said.

    “Well, he didn’t forget you. Every time I saw him he’d ask how you were doing. He’d reminisce about the many days you spent over ‘his side of the fence’ as he put it,” Mom told him.

    “I loved that old house he lived in,” Jack said.

    “You know, Jack, after your father died, Mr. Belser stepped in to make sure you had a man’s influence in your life,” she said.

    “He’s the one who taught me carpentry,” he said. “I wouldn’t be in this business if it weren’t for him. He spent a lot of time teaching me things he thought were important. Mom, I’ll be there for the funeral,” Jack said.

    As busy as he was, he kept his word. Jack caught the next flight to his hometown. Mr. Belser’s funeral was small and uneventful. He had no children of his own, and most of his relatives had passed away.

    The night before he had to return home, Jack and his Mom stopped by to see the old house next door one more time. Standing in the doorway, Jack paused for a moment. It was like crossing over into another dimension, a leap through space and time. The house was exactly as he remembered.

    Every step held memories. Every picture, every piece of furniture…Jack stopped suddenly…

    “What’swrong, Jack?” his Mom asked.

    “The box is gone,” he said.

    “What box?” Mom asked.

    “There was a small gold box that he kept locked on top of his desk. I must have asked him a thousand times what was inside. All he’d ever tell me was ‘the thing I value most,'” Jack said.

    It was gone. Everything about the house was exactly how Jack remembered it, except for the box. He figured someone from the Belser family had taken it.

    “Now I’ll never know what was so valuable to him,” Jack said.

    “I better get some sleep. I have an early flight home, Mom.”

    It had been about two weeks since Mr. Belser died. Returning home from work one day Jack discovered a note in his mailbox. “Signature required on a package. No one at home. Please stop by the main post office within the next three days,” the note read.

    Early the next day Jack went to the post office and retrieved the package. The small box was old and looked like it had been mailed a hundred years ago. The handwriting was difficult to read, but the return address caught his attention.

    “Mr. Harold Belser” it read.

    Jack took the box out to his car and ripped open the package. There inside was the gold box and an envelope.

    Jack’s hands shook as he read the note inside.

    “Upon my death, please forward this box and its contents to Jack Bennett. It’s the thing I valued most in my life.” A small key was taped to the letter. His heart racing, as tears filled his eyes, Jack carefully unlocked the box. There inside he found a beautiful gold pocket watch.

    Running his fingers slowly over the finely etched casing, he unlatched the cover. Inside he found these words engraved: “Jack, Thanks for your time! — Harold Belser.”

    “The thing he valued most was my time!”

    Jack held the watch for a few minutes, then called his office and cleared his appointments for the next two days.*

    “Why?” Janet, his assistant asked.

    “I need some time to spend with the people I love and say I care for,” he said. “Oh, by the way, Janet, thanks for your time!”

    “Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away.”

    Think about this. You may not realize it, but it’s 100 percent true.

    1. At least 15 people in this world love you in some way.

    2. A smile from you can bring happiness to anyone, even if they don’t like you.

    3. Every night, SOMEONE thinks about you before they go to sleep.

    4. You mean the world to someone.

    5. If not for you, someone may not be living.

    6. You are special and unique.

    7. Have trust sooner or later you will get what you wish for or something better.

    8. When you make the biggest mistake ever, something good can still come from it.

    9. When you think the world has turned its back on you, take a hard look: you most likely turned your back on the world and the people who love and care for you.

    10. Someone that you don’t even know exists loves you.

    11. Always remember the compliments you received. Forget about the rude remarks.

    12. Always tell someone how you feel about them; you will feel much better when they know and you’ll both be happy.

    13. If you have a great friend, take the time to let them know that they are great.

    Share this letter with all the people you care about. In doing so, you will certainly brighten someone’s day and might change their perspective on life…for the better.

    To everyone who read this just now….
    *”Thanks for your time.”* 🙂

    Supergold-Wainuiomata (Wellington)

    #1734936
    Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 51
    Replies: 12330
    Hero42

    I was sitting having a leisurely lunch today and watching a lone tui in a kowhai tree. The tree still had most of its flowers so it was a nice food source for the tui.
    The tui was resplendent with the blue flashes from his wings showing up either side of his black back and tail. The grey collar and white throat feather were equally resplendent.

    Every now and again the tui would hop up to a flower and take a sip of nectar, balancing precariously at times but he had more than enough food and he was in no rush to feed from every flower taking time to stop and sing in between sips.

    But for all this bounty this tui did not want to share and would chase any other bird from the tree be it a sparrow or blackbird or another tui.

    I thought back a few weeks when I observed another kowhai tree with ten or more tuis feeding in it and there was no fighting over the food, just contented harmony as they feasted on nature’s bounty.

    I guess tuis aren’t too much different from people. Some want to keep all the riches of nature to themselves and others are happy to share.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1735056
    jens
    Member
    Member since: May 3, 2006
    Topics: 15
    Replies: 7746
    jens

    Hero42 – but  sharing riches with  spendthrifts  is like  pouring them into a bottomless pit  –  and would not  reasonable  people soon  get tired and disillusioned with it  – unless they are  forced to  do it  by someone else ?

    #1735094
    Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 51
    Replies: 12330
    Hero42

    Jens
    I am not going to engage in a financial discussion but here is something you might want to watch and think about.

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/money/2019/10/capital-in-the-21st-century-film-says-political-system-hasn-t-dealt-with-the-capital-crisis.html

    Capital in the Twenty-First Century examines inequality of wealth through time and how a progressive tax on capital could be the answer.

    Based on French economist Thomas Piketty’s book, the documentary-style film looks at the capital superpowers – Britain, France, the US and China – from the Industrial Revolution to World War II and beyond.

    Enjoy.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1735095
    Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 51
    Replies: 12330
    Hero42

    Now this is something to think about.

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/world/2019/10/we-don-t-really-know-what-it-is-paris-zoo-unveils-bizarre-blob-with-hundreds-of-sexes.html

    Part of the Myxomycetes family, a class of slime molds, a blob is neither an animal nor a fungus but has characteristics of both.

    Though it has no mouth, no stomach and no eyes, the blob can still detect and eat its food.

    The “blob” doesn’t even have a brain, yet it is capable of finding solutions to problems and transmitting the knowledge it learns.

    The blob will learn how to get past the barrier and get to its food, and it will start to do this more quickly and more strongly. If we fuse two blobs together, the one which learned will transmit its knowledge to the other.

    Is this an ancient organism that is the link between plant and animals? Something that can move, solve problems and learn even without a brain. Something that could eventually evolve into a more structured life form as we think of and know animals.

    Really does make you think.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1735098
    arandar
    Member
    Member since: November 23, 2009
    Topics: 31
    Replies: 10865
    arandar

    OMG!!!

    🤭

    Arandar

    #1735100
    supergold
    Member
    Member since: May 9, 2009
    Topics: 65
    Replies: 9180
    supergold

    Now this is something to think about.

    Wow! I wonder if the blob is in any way related to the jellyfish as they don’t have a brain either but still manage to get around and find food.

    Supergold-Wainuiomata (Wellington)

    #1735131
    jens
    Member
    Member since: May 3, 2006
    Topics: 15
    Replies: 7746
    jens

    Hahaha Hero42.

    The  economic function   of saving and investment started  with the  first laboriously  polished  stone ax, and  since without  that procedure  nothing  beyond  hand-to-mouth survival on the  gifts of  nature  – (including  houses to be  built)  – can  be achieved  (or can  you give us an example to refute that ?)  –

    it is not  the act of saving and investment (capitalism)  that  has  failed  to build  enough  houses in New Zealand  –  but because not enough  of it has been practiced  by those  wishing  to own or seeing the  need for more  houses.

    In any economy  –  call it  what you like  –  there is a limit to  unprofitable  investments, beyond  which more  poverty than  wealth is being  created.

    So, if too many  unprofitably leased  state  houses  compete with profitable rentals  and the will  for the  prudence of  house  ownership, it is no wonder  that  a shortage of  houses  is building up, if the  state cannot  afford  to build more  of them without running deeper into  debt for  unprofitable investment.

    So – the  fault is not with  profitable economics, but with  too big a proportion of  people (and  governments?)  not practicing it.

    I have read a book by Picketty, and a  fair solution to the unequal  participation in wealth ownership  might be in the introduction  of a systematic  effort  towards wealth  ownership  by all  –  which I  believe  will  also get  more  practical and  moral support   from the  prosperous  if the  have-nots  (too poor to save) are also included in the (subsidized) effort through the  taxation system,

    And what  could we learn  from the  “blobs” ?

    Arandar  –  what  does OMG  stand for  ?

    #1735262
    jens
    Member
    Member since: May 3, 2006
    Topics: 15
    Replies: 7746
    jens

    In today’s  –  Sat., 19th of Oct.  –  Weekend  Business Herald the article “Feeling  a bit  richer?”  in a matter  of  fact  way  states that  traditionally  domestic  capital poor New Zealand  has  saved via KiwiSaver in the  last 12 years $57 billion, i.e.  averaging nearly $20 000 per  account, and  this has helped some  bigger account  owners towards  first home  ownership already.

    There is no  doubt that KiwiSaving is  national and personal wealth  ownership  creative which benefits  the  national and  personal  economies

    Would not  now  –  with the budget  surplus – be a good  time  for introducing  the   $1000.-. KiwiSaver  kick-start – unconditionally  –  to all who have not received it yet ?

    This  would  increase  the national  wealth reserve while  simultaneously  being   a welfare  bonus (or tax rebate?) to those over  65, who up to now have been  excluded from  enrolling with KiwiSaving.

    While  becoming  part  of the estate of those  passing  away before age 65, it should be  available  for  withdrawal by those  close to death  because of  serious illness at whatever  age, if  desired so  by its  owner.

    Is that  not  worth while to think about  as a  constructive  step  forward ?

     

     

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