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This topic contains 300 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of kai kai 8 hours, 21 minutes ago.

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  • #1625615
    Profile photo of kai
    kai
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    Member since: January 4, 2008
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    Love those falls etc Val Just amazing.

    Edith Cavell bridge Queenstown Hope its not been up here before .

    Love that whole area ..

     

    Cheers From Kai

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    #1625715
    Profile photo of bobbity
    bobbity
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    Super photos everyone. Kai.. that was a great old fashioned kai time photo!  Beautiful falls Val, I don’t know how you all come up withj such great photos.

    This is a little place you may not be aware of, but maybe you do know it. Kerosene creek, it smells of kerosene but when you enter the water you don’t come out smelling of kerosene, so it must be in the ground or something??  It’s situated in the pine forests outside of Rotorua, on the way to Taupo and Kaiangaroa, where I lived for 5 years as a child. We would pester dad to stop on the way home to visit the creek and we visited for a swim  a lot. Today it has been ‘commercialised’, but still looks nearly the same, except there was only a trodden track through the pine forest, which was hard to find from the main road.  The pool by the fall is the only place to swim there.

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    I love all GUppies
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    #1625731
    Profile photo of vale019
    vale019
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    Member since: August 20, 2012
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    Kai – what a neat pic- we must have missed that when we’ve been there. It looks pristine & untouched by time. Thanks sooo much xx

    Bobbity – that video of Kerosene Creek!  – WOW – Fantastic – that name doesn’t do that beautiful, outstanding place justice. Thanks a heap for posting xx

    • This reply was modified 1 week ago by Profile photo of vale019 vale019.
    #1625775
    Profile photo of vale019
    vale019
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    Member since: August 20, 2012
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    Americas Cup tomorrow morning – fingers crossed 😎
    americascup1497656966557

     

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    #1625777
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    vale019
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    Nude swimmers prepare to take the plunge in Lake Rotoiti – – The Marlborough Express

    The Blue Duck Nude Midwinter Swim, the highest midwinter swim in New Zealand, will lure the eccentric, the bold and the brave to Lake Rotoiti on Sunday.
    And it will go ahead rain, hail or shine.
    Organiser Bill McEwan said there were nine swimmers last year, most on the wrong side of middle age.
    “The swim is about the love of life. We are enjoying being fully alive and it’s to celebrate the beauty of life.”
    The idea for an annual skinny dip at Lake Rotoiti, in the Nelson Lakes National Park, came from a midwinter Christmas party between a few Department of Conservation rangers in 2002.
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    Now in its 15th year, the event was predominantly male, but women were greatly appreciated, he said.
    “Women really add a lot to it. Last year a participant brought some hot water bottles for afterwards.”
    McEwan said his favourite part came, somewhat unsurprisingly, after the dip.
    “Everyone sits around and talks to each other.
    “Most of us have never met before. It creates a bond between a group of people that generally have never met.”
    The Blue Duck Nude Midwinter Swim is at noon on June 18. Anyone willing to brave the cold is welcome.

     

     

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    #1625788
    Profile photo of kai
    kai
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    Member since: January 4, 2008
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    Must say Bobbity been to Rotorua, dozens of times and never been to the Kerosene track amazing what’s hidden away,, when we just go to specific places that are on the beaten track (not off it)

    Would’ve been a gr8 family outing for you all

    Yep for the ones here with early morning wakeups,,, ❓ prob will tune in to the racing

    Fascinating way they do that sailing,,, so that’s a gr8 part of the appreciation here.

    For a small place, we bring out some gr8 sailors lol Let the best ones win !!

    Cheers From Kai

    • This reply was modified 6 days, 23 hours ago by Profile photo of kai kai.
    • This reply was modified 6 days, 23 hours ago by Profile photo of kai kai.
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    #1625932
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    vale019
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     Matariki: The Māori New Year   Matariki: Te Tau Hou Māori –Te Papa

    What is Matariki? Ko Matariki kei runga, ko te tohu tēnā o te tau!
    Matariki signals the Māori New Year. It is a time of renewal and celebration that begins with the rising of the Matariki star cluster (the Pleiades or Seven Sisters).

    The Matariki star cluster. The two meanings of Matariki both refer to stars: mata ariki (eyes of god) and mata riki (little eyes).

    When is Matariki?
    Matariki is a star cluster which appears in the night sky during mid-winter. According to the Maramataka (the Māori lunar calendar), the reappearance of Matariki, brings the old lunar year to a close and marks the beginning of the New Year. Hence, Matariki is associated with the Māori New Year.
    Ka puta Matariki ka rere Whānui.
    Ko te tohu tēnā o te tau e!
    Matariki reappears, Vega starts its flight.
    The New Year begins!
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    Festivities;
    Traditionally, festivities were conducted to celebrate Matariki, they followed the harvesting of crops when the pātaka food storehouses were full, freeing up time for family and leisure.
    These festivities included the lighting of ritual fires, the making of offerings, and celebrations of various kinds to farewell the dead, to honour ancestors, and to celebrate life.
    Ngā kai a Matariki, nāna i ao ake ki runga.
    The foods of Matariki, gathered up by her.

    Tohunga (spiritual expert) looked to the Matariki star cluster to find out how abundant the upcoming year’s harvest would be. Bright, clear stars promised a warm and successful season. Hazy stars, however, warned of cold weather and poor crops.

    How is Matariki celebrated?
    The twinkling of the Matariki stars in the pre-dawn sky heralds a special celebration for young and old. Across New Zealand, people come together to remember their ancestors, share food, sing, tell stories, and play music.
    Matariki festivities highlight the tangata whenua indigenous view of the world. They remind us of the cycle of life and natural ways of marking the passing of time.

    Fun and learning
    Families gather together during the long, cold nights of Matariki for learning and entertainment. Whare tapere entertainment, which included tākaro (games) and haka (dance), is an important part of  Matariki celebrations.

    Remembrance
    Matariki, as a marker of transition, was a natural time for families to mourn and honour those who had passed away in the previous year. These loved ones were believed to have transformed into stars – te hunga kua whetūrangitia – shining down from the heavens
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    #1625940
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    vale019
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    The difference between Puanga and Matariki  – Ko Puanga, ko Matariki me ō rāua hononga
    Some iwi tribes celebrate Puanga rather than Matariki.  Che Wilson of Whanganui iwi explains why this is the case, and which iwi celebrate Puanga.

    ‘Ko Puanga te pae ārahi i ngā tohu o te tau hou i te pae ururangi’
    ‘Puanga leads the celestial signs to herald the New Year.’

    All iwi celebrate the Māori New Year in June or July, but not all iwi refer specifically to this time of year as Matariki. Instead, other iwi will name this time of year ‘Puanga’.

    Why do some iwi look for Puanga?
    Puanga is given prominence mainly because some iwi tribes struggle to see Matariki clearly from their locality and therefore look to the next important star near Matariki. That star is Puanga.
    This is not a rejection of Matariki as many of these iwi will still refer to Matariki and the other names in the constellation in their tribal narratives, however Puanga is given preference.

    Which iwi celebrate Puanga?

    The tribes of Whanganui, Taranaki, parts of the Far North, and parts of the South Island recognise Puanga.

    What is Puanga?
    Puanga is the star Rigel and is the brightest star in the Orion constellation. Matariki is seen below Puanga and to the left of Tautoru (the three stars of Orion’s Belt) in the late autumn and early winter night sky.
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    The most common whakataukī proverb that recognises the importance of Puanga is: ‘Puanga kai rau’ – ‘The abundant harvest of Puanga.’
    This whakataukī connects Puanga and Matariki celebrations to the result of hard work over a number of months. It recognises the efforts of growing, harvesting, and storing food for the long nights of takurua winter as Tamanuiterā sun god returns to his first wife Hinetakurua winter maiden.
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    This union results in short days and long nights over the winter months. However, every year Māui recaptures Tamanuiterā, and he then marries his second wife Hineraumati summer maiden where the nights are short and the days are long as a result of summer – so it could be argued that Māui is the founder of daylight savings.

    When is Puanga celebrated?
    Puanga isn’t celebrated over one or two days, instead it is a period of approximately a month or longer with at least two months of preparation followed by two months of wānanga (learning).
    The first new moon in the month of Pipiri (June-July) is the period when stars like Puanga, Matariki and Whānui Vega set. This time is a chance to reflect on the past year and to remember your loved ones.
    Puanga and Matariki then rises again in a fortnight in the eastern sky, this is the time to acknowledge the rising of our loved ones that have passed so that their spirits become stars and to prepare for the celebrations of the New Year.
    The appropriate time to commence celebrations is based on the nights of abundance for your locality and some will recognise the nights of Rākau full moon and others, the nights of Tangaroa – one week after full moon. This is to ensure that any food available is in abundance so that the hākari feast dedicated and celebrated in the name of Puanga is recognised appropriately.
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    The connection between the kererū and Puanga
    The kererū  wood pigeon is synonymous with Puanga kai rau (noted above) because during this time of year the kererū is fat after eating the miro and tawa berries. The large amount of berries ferment in the bird’s stomach causing drunkenness – making the kererū very easy to catch.
    This meant kererū were the food of choice during Puanga celebrations. The first bird was always given to the senior women of the whānau.
    The stomach of the kererū were also fed to expecting mothers to help quell any food cravings and to ensure that mother and unborn child were given the most nutritious foods.

    Puanga and gardening activities
    Puanga is also a time to prepare the māra garden and ensure that winter frosts will help to kill any weeds or soil infections.
    This time is likened to, and re-enacts, the creation period of Te Kore (the void/potential) and once the land has been treated, it will then go through a period of Te Pō (the night – or a time to plant). Then as the shoots of the food sprout above the soil, the plants transition into Te Ao Mārama (the world of light).
    Like Matariki, Puanga is a time of reflection, preparation, learning and celebration

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    #1626164
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    vale019
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    Te Kuiti eventually unveils a statue of a ‘bloody good bugger’, Colin Meads
    Stuff –  June 19th 3017

    As a dominant All Black locking pairing in the 1960s Colin and Stan Meads were great at hauling down lineout ball, yet on Monday a dinky piece of rope and a stubborn shroud caused them angst.
    Meant to fall away like an English fullback tackling the great Jonah Lomu, the shroud instead clung on in what a referee would have deemed a blatant head high.
    Colin-Meads1497850506133_jpg

    Anticipation soared as Stan and Sir Colin applied their muscle, only for their clean out of the ruck to fail – the shroud remained in full shroud mode.
    Then a bronzed boot emerged, a left leg, and finally there was Colin Meads in all the rampaging glory of his youth – in full stride, a rugby ball glued in one enormous mitt.
    Often statues fail to capture their subject. Not this one. It could only have been more realistic had he been playing with one arm broken, as he did in South Africa in 1970, or had his boots been trampling would-be tacklers into the turf. A tanalised fencepost or two might have been a nice touch.
    Colin-Meads

    Speaking after his more famous brother, 1961-1966 All Black Stan Meads said he felt like “the dog following behind the car,” saying he didn’t mind living in the shadow of big brother.
    “He’s a bloody good bugger, that’s all I’ll say,” he told the crowd.

    Stan Meads, Sir Colin Meads & Dame Verna Meads
    StanColinVernaMeads1497850506133_jpg

     

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    #1626202
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    vale019
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    Tokangawhā / Split Apple Rock – From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Tokangawhā / Split Apple Rock is a geological rock formation in The Tasman Bay off the northern coast of the South Island of New Zealand.    Made of granite, it is in the shape of an apple which has been cut in half.

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    It is a popular tourist attraction in the waters of the Tasman Sea approximately 50 metres off the coast between Kaiteriteri and Marahau.   The rock sits in shallow water at low tide and is accessible by wading.

    Split_Apple_Rock_New_Zealand_ritebook.in-007

    The cleft to produce two sides of the ‘apple’ was a natural occurrence. It is unknown when this happened and therefore the cleaving of the rock has attracted mythological explanations.

    The name Split Apple Rock was made official in 1988, and was officially altered to Tokangawhā / Split Apple Rock in August 2014.

    split-apple-rock

     

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