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NEW ZEALAND photos, articles, human interest stories, fun or interesting.

This topic contains 1887 replies, has 28 voices, and was last updated by  vale019 > 7 days ago.

Discussions News & Current Affairs (excluding Politics) NEW ZEALAND photos, articles, human interest stories, fun or interesting.

Viewing 10 posts - 1,831 through 1,840 (of 1,888 total)
  • #1723449
    vale019
    Member
    Member since: August 20, 2012
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 26612
    vale019

    Thank you SO much, SG. That is indeed a beautiful story. Wonderful people and wonderful art.

    #1725216
    kai
    Member
    Member since: January 4, 2008
    Topics: 223
    Replies: 9456
    kai

    Hope this works today..Auckland 1970 love it!!

     

    Cheers From Kai

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 4 weeks ago by  kai.
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    #1725221
    vale019
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    Member since: August 20, 2012
    Topics: 9
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    vale019

    Good one, Kai. I remember that look 🙄  😆 😆  Thanks for posting 💋

    #1725222
    vale019
    Member
    Member since: August 20, 2012
    Topics: 9
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    vale019

    Camp breakfast with Weet-bix, and tea in china cups, 1939.

    2.camp tea 1939 2019

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    #1725228
    kai
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    Member since: January 4, 2008
    Topics: 223
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    kai

    Thanks Val it seems like yesterday that pram and pushchair one,1970 ,, but must say I dont remember a pram like tha,,t the pushchair I remember though ,,

     

    Love that one you just posted too Val (smiles) nowadays that would be called glamping !!

     

     

    Cheers From Kai

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    #1725267
    vale019
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    Member since: August 20, 2012
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    vale019

    1952 Christchurch Transport Board (NZ) AEC Regal IV with either Crossley or Park Royal body (fleet number obscured by the prams).
    It was common practice to dangle prams, pushchairs and bicycles from the hangers on the front of a bus.

    5 Baby transport New Zealand c 1950s

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    #1725272
    vale019
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    Member since: August 20, 2012
    Topics: 9
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    vale019

    Love that one you just posted too Val (smiles) nowadays that would be called glamping !!

    ‘glamping’ – lolol – love that Kai!!!  😆 😆
    Plus I don’t know now what we did all day back then – not a cell phone in sight – hahaha!!!!!

    #1725273
    vale019
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    Member since: August 20, 2012
    Topics: 9
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    vale019

    Pink and White Terraces of Otukapuarangi, 1890, Charles Blomfield.

    Charles Blomfield (1848–1926) painted the Pink Terraces four years after they were buried by the eruption of Mt Tarawera. His highly romantic paintings strove for an aesthetic ideal.

    3 pink and white terraces 003

    Pink and White Terraces of Otukapuarangi after Eruption of Mt Tarawera, 1886.

    Sent to New Zealand in the hope of relieving his tuberculosis, George Valentine travelled extensively, photographing throughout the North Island as well as in the Pacific. He was one of a number of topographic photographers who were lucky enough to see the Pink and White Terraces at Mt Tarawera shortly before its eruption. And like many, he also went back to document the aftermath.

    This photograph shows the utter destruction caused by the eruption and uses a common trope of topographic photography of the time – placing people in the frame – to give a sense of scale.

    4 terraces after eruption 004

     

     

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    #1725601
    supergold
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    Member since: May 9, 2009
    Topics: 65
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    supergold

    The eruption that destroyed the Pink and White Terraces must have been dreadful for those who lived through it. What a shame to lose such a beautiful place.

    Supergold-Wainuiomata (Wellington)

    #1725602
    supergold
    Member
    Member since: May 9, 2009
    Topics: 65
    Replies: 9099
    supergold

    Whatever happened to … NZ’s iconic Footrot Flats cartoons?
    Georgia Forrester
    10:11, Jul 16 2019

    Footrot Flats is an iconic cartoon strip that’s still got quite a following today.
    As Kiwis, we’re proud of our little country and all the things that put us on the world stage. ‘Whatever happened to…’ is a series looking at how some of our most iconic treasures came to be and where they are now.

    Footrot Flats is one of the most iconic cartoons in our country’s history.

    The comic strip of Wal’ and his dog brought joy to many and inspired generations of Kiwi kids.

    For years, creator Murray Ball amused readers with the quirky adventures of Wal’, Dog, Horse, Aunt Dolly, Cooch, Gussie and Pew.

    Between 1976 and 1994, the Footrot Flats comic strips ran in newspapers here and around the world, earning a huge global following.

    READ MORE:
    * Kiwis remember Footrot Flats creator Murray Ball
    * Murray Ball gave us a slice of heaven: Tom Scott
    * Tom Scott has Drawn Out his life in just-launched memoir
    * Footrot Flats cartoonist Murray Ball to be honoured at hometown’s Rural Day

    1563232583648

    Horse the cat was one of the many popular animals depicted throughout the Footrot Flats series.
    Horse the cat was one of the many popular animals depicted throughout the Footrot Flats series. (Used with permission from the Ball family.)
    But did you know that even today, the cartoons are being published daily?

    A KIWI ICON

    The comic’s protagonist was a border collie sheepdog known as Dog, who was often depicted getting into mischief, alongside his owner Wal’ Footrot.

    The setting was a sheep and beef farm called Footrot Flats, which was near the fictional town of Raupo in New Zealand.

    The comics were relatable for many Kiwi families, and appealed “to everybody”, Ball’s wife Pam says.

    “I think it appeals to farmers especially and townies alike, across the board, all age groups.”

    1563232583649

    Many of the cartoons used humour rural New Zealanders could easily relate to. (Used with permission from the Ball family.)
    Many of the cartoons used humour rural New Zealanders could easily relate to. (Used with permission from the Ball family.)
    Those from rural backgrounds in particular likely found humour in the trial and error of farming Ball often drew in the comics.

    Whether it was Wal’ being chased by a bull, being zapped by the electric fence, getting the truck stuck deep in mud, or the many games of cricket, golf, tennis and rugby Dog and Wal’ played – there was a little something for everyone.

    Over the years the comic strips were printed in about 120 newspapers, and had a wide-reaching global audience.

    An animated feature film called Footrot Flats: The Dog’s Tale was made in the late 80s, which featured Billy T James and music by Dave Dobbyn. Many books were also illustrated and published over the years, as well as a stage play.

    1563232583650
    MURRAY BALL: ‘FIERCELY POLITICAL’

    Ball himself was well regarded by many. His friends have described him as a brilliant and passionate man, with a love for rugby.

    Fellow cartoonist Tom Scott once described some of Ball’s work as “fiercely political and fiercely egalitarian”.

    In some of his earlier comics, Ball touched on more controversial topics, such the politics of the time and the Springbok rugby tour.

    Ball was born in New Zealand, but some of his earlier years were spent in Australia and South Africa.

    During the 80s, when New Zealand’s climate was rife with controversy over the 1981 Springboks tour, Murray was vocal about his views.

    In 1985, when Footrot Flats’ Dog was the mascot for the All Blacks, Ball opposed the team’s planned trip to South Africa.

    He penned a letter to The Dominion newspaper in the voice of Dog, resigning from his mascot position.

    1563232583651

    Just one of more than 6000 Footrot Flats comic strips Murray Ball did over the years. (Used with permission from the Ball family.)
    DIOGENES DESIGNS LTD
    Just one of more than 6000 Footrot Flats comic strips Murray Ball did over the years. (Used with permission from the Ball family.)
    In the 90s Ball also penned a book called The Sisterhood, which had a controversial (to say the least) view of feminism and the breakdown of traditional family values.

    The Footrot Flats website says Ball has amused, delighted and, at times, offended readers of his cartoons over many years:

    “He made no secret of his desire to use his characters to ‘change the world’ and, for a while it seemed that his cartoons would serve only to agitate – all this changed in the mid-1970s when he decided that a cartoon about a farmer and his sheep-dog ‘might be a good idea’.”

    The vast majority of Ball’s catalogue of work, especially Footrot Flats, is widely well-regarded. In 2002, Ball became an officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM) for his services as a cartoonist.

    So why did the cartoon stop running in our papers?

    Cartoonist Murray Ball, pictured in September 1993.
    BILL KEARNS/ DOMINION
    Cartoonist Murray Ball, pictured in September 1993.
    Ball’s son Gareth says his father wrote a piece at the time explaining that he felt that the New Zealand of Footrot Flats was fading away.

    His father felt that the ethos of the simple, humble and generous life depicted in the strips was being swamped by capitalism, corporatism, and consumerism. The end of the cartoon in Kiwi papers came with a statement.

    But as for the ending of the Footrot Flats cartoon, it was simple: “The characters had grown up”, Gareth says.

    The long-running cartoon had had it’s time and his father had a head full of new characters and ideas. “Things which had been bottled up for the 30 odd years that Footrot Flats had ruled the roost,” Gareth says.

    Ball died in 2017, and was mourned by Kiwis and fans from all over the world.

    The adventures of Wal’ and Dog amused and delighted readers for decades. (Used with permission from the Ball family.)
    DIOGENES DESIGNS LTD
    The adventures of Wal’ and Dog amused and delighted readers for decades. (Used with permission from the Ball family.)
    FOOTROT FLATS TODAY

    Today, just one Kiwi paper regularly prints the Footrot Flats comic strip: the Gisborne Herald, Pam Ball says.

    Gareth Ball runs the Footrot Flats website which regularly publishes his father’s cartoons, and also posts them to the official Facebook page.

    “After dad passed away we sort of were confronted I suppose by all this work which needed looking after and preserving,” he says.

    Recently the Ball family have been archiving, preserving and digitising more than 6000 Footrot Flats cartoons to make sure there’s a complete record of Murray’s work.

    Murray drew many other cartoons, including more than 1000 Stanley the Palaeolithic Hero comics, which the Ball family are also in the middle of documenting.

    “It was a really popular cartoon and actually Murray always said that that was the cartoon that he liked best. Stanley was his favourite,” Pam says.

    Although time has passed, Footrot Flats is still incredibly popular among Kiwis.

    The official Facebook page has nearly 60,000 followers, with a large chunk of the fans based in Australia.

    “A lot of them comment, ‘A great Aussie comic strip’, and then they’re quickly corrected,” Gareth says.

    He says the page is a way for people to keep up with the popular cartoons.

    “It’s just a nice way to repay the fans that dad accumulated over his career. To keep them in the loop.

    “It’s great. Looking at the comments is really nice for us and sort of keeps his memory alive a little bit.”

    Says Pam: “I think he’d be delighted to know that it’s still around really.”

    Over the years, Footrot Flats had a lot of references to popular sports played in New Zealand. (Used with permission from the Ball family.)
    DIOGENES DESIGNS LTD
    Over the years, Footrot Flats had a lot of references to popular sports played in New Zealand. (Used with permission from the Ball family.)
    WHAT’S NEXT FOR FOOTROT?

    Gareth considers his dad’s comic strip to be “a New Zealand icon and it’s quite up there with Buzzy Bee”, and, judging by the following Footrot Flats still has today, there are likely many Kiwi fans out there who’d agree.

    Over the years fans have requested new books, merchandise and films. A fan even asked whether it was possible for Netflix to pick it up.

    If the opportunity ever arose in the future, Gareth says they’d “definitely” consider it.

    The family have also considered translating a few of the comics into te reo Māori.

    MORE FROM
    GEORGIA FORRESTER • REPORTER
    georgia.forrester@stuff.co.nz
    “At the moment we’re in that phase of preserving and looking after it and further down the track we might look at doing something.

    “People are still calling out for it but we’ll just take it slowly, I think.”

    Click on the link below for a short video and more cartoons.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/114075672/whatever-happened-to–nzs-iconic-footrot-flats-cartoons

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/107181686/footrot-flats-cartoonist-murray-ball-to-be-honoured-at-hometowns-rural-day?rm=m

    Supergold-Wainuiomata (Wellington)

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