Login/Join to access your personalised dashboard now! Returning user? Log in or Register
Log in to your GrownUps

How Many firearms are needed in NZ?

This topic contains 39 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of gbly86290 gbly86290 4 days, 13 hours ago.

Discussions News & Current Affairs (excluding Politics) How Many firearms are needed in NZ?

Viewing 10 posts - 21 through 30 (of 40 total)
  • #1714619
    Profile photo of arandararandar
    Member
    Member since: November 23, 2009
    Topics: 61
    Replies: 10711
    arandar

    True, Ted.  Not something I approve or understand – nor do I call it hunting, actually, more like shooting fish in a barrel.  And it leads to the sort of disgusting behaviour when rich people pay fortunes to shoot endangered trophy animals, elephants, lions, tigers, giraffes, fgs.

    We hosted tourists on our farm and sometimes took them on guided hunts.

    A very few brought their guns with them having complied with our stringent laws to import but most by far borrowed/hired a rifle from our guides. After showing us their gun licences of course and informing us of their experience.

    Ours were ‘proper’ hunts – no guaranteed finds or kills or helicopters or bearers – hike for miles on your own two feet in and out; if you’d been lucky, with your pig or deer over your own shoulders – and our guides carried your guns because, as 1 said to me, “I don’t want a stranger with a firearm behind me.”

    Arandar

    #1714664
    Profile photo of Hero42Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 66
    Replies: 11903
    Hero42

    This is an interesting article that outlines how we got here and what people can buy.

    https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/385058/a-short-history-of-nz-s-gun-laws-from-cutlasses-to-semi-automatics

    Cheers 🙂

    #1714678
    Profile photo of TedETedE
    Member
    Member since: May 6, 2006
    Topics: 6
    Replies: 2250
    TedE

    Thanks for that Hero42, the law is even more lax than I thought. The article seemed to make the case that the situation is out of control and it would not be right to try and change the present situation. Those who currently have these weapons are all good guys and should be allowed to get on with it.
    Is disagree. We need to bite the bullet and get on with it now.

    I am of the opinion that a .22 is just as dangerous as those of the larger calibre. So
    I think that all automatic or semi automatic weapons need to be removed.

    I also believe that we have no place in NZ for handguns of an sort.
    Pistol shooters will get over it in just a few years we shouldn’t even notice they’ve gone.

    Air/gas powered rifles and pistols are no longer the toys they once were and again the repeat actions were a terrible waste of ammunition as I saw it, when, as a teenager I first came across them. (They were a big advance on the pump and load and for me to expensive to dream of operating.)

    When I was learning to shoot we used a single shot .22 with a piece of number 8 wire to eject the cartridge. I only got one shot, so it had to count. My father was always insistent on the projectile still being lethal at 1 mile (not that I ever tested that as I feel the projectile probably went end over end). But his insistence of considering where the projectile was going to end up was an important part of his instructions and the consideration of ricochet so that the angles need to be considered carefully. This is not something the modern film makers seem to consider and I think leads to much of todays modern blase attitudes to firearms and there, especially when you so often see high powered guns used on the streets where shotguns are more appropriate.
    Using high powered wepons in indoors is another one of those film maker no no’s cos if the wall is light timber framed it’s not likely to stop it and you don’t know what’s on the other side, if it’s a concrete apartment building then it’s likely to whistle around a few walls before it’s spent unless the angle is acute only then it will embed itself so when the police carry a handgun of larger calibre into a building there is a lot for them to consider prior to firing. You really need to be sure that the body mass is going to hold that projectile.

    All things considered the fewer firearms we have in NZ with lethal potential the better.

    Those living on farms have reason for them and most farmers are a bit wary of the weekend warriors who want to shoot in their areas, but bolt action with 5 round magazine is quite adequate. i understand the deer cullers need for semi-automatics when helicopter shooting but those who undertake that roll are working under the auspices of the DOC. I’m sure that there can be a legitimate special license category for the few who undertake that sort of roll.

    TedE - Papakura -

    #1714684
    Profile photo of TailsNZTailsNZ
    Member
    Member since: October 31, 2010
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 64
    TailsNZ

    the gun lobby bought out national in the 80’s??? i think it was, and stopped registering the firearm in favour of registering the user. well that was a failure and even recently paula bennet admitted being bought out by the gun lobby when law change was discussed. as a hunter and culler in my younger days i owned three guns. a shotgun for rabbit, a 22 for rabbit and possum and a 308 for larger animals. none of these were semi automatic or had a scope. if you take your time you don’t need either. i have seen idiots with semi auto’s and they tend to spray and pray rather than take their time to get a clean kill shot. the other thing is i hunted alone… i don’t trust adrenalin rushes in other people who have a fire arm in their hands. fire arms are not the issue, there is a place for them. but the type of fire arm available needs to be managed carefully. someone in an earlier post said a bolt action with a 5 shot magazine was enough. i agree. if you can’t hunt with that you shouldn’t be out there.

    #1714691
    Profile photo of MC39412MC39412
    Member
    Member since: July 29, 2009
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 1
    MC39412

    To store peoples firearms in a central depository is ridiculous idea. If someone wants to go for a hunt why should they drive miles to sign out their legally acquired gun and miles back afterward? Making firearms licencing a chore like licencing your car – you must be joking. Licencing my car was no chore, I did it on line. Firearms must already be stored under lock and key in an approved, checked by police, container. To gain a firearms licence you must sit an exam, have your background checked by police and have two people support your application where they are interviewed privately about you and your reason for owning a fire arm. If police were warned about the suitability of some gun club members to have firearms, then the police would have or should have checked this out.

    Owning automatic firearms and pistols you require a special licence, and handguns have even more stringent regulations.

    To go off on rants over gun ownership when the huge majority of firearm owners have a genuine reason to own them, and are careful cautious people is the usual knee jerk reaction. How many people in NZ are killed by people driving cars, children killed by those who should be protecting them, people killing themselves because they feel their lives are such shit. Why don’t you all address these issues?

    I have been reading on social media some of the worst racist and hate writings on the issue of this murder that occurred in Christchurch, and they are written by people who state they are against racism and hatred. This country is full of underlying hate, and what needs to be addressed is the social problems that lead toward this, and toward people in our society like the murderer at the Mosques.

    #1714695
    Profile photo of arandararandar
    Member
    Member since: November 23, 2009
    Topics: 61
    Replies: 10711
    arandar

    What might be some of the reasons why someone needs a military style firearm at home, albeit safely and legally stored, please?

    Arandar

    #1714750
    Profile photo of steph154370steph154370
    Member
    Member since: August 12, 2018
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 338
    steph154370

    Its quite simple Arandar-there are no reasons whatsoever  why anyone would need a military style firearm at home. albeit safely and legally stored. The sole purpose of such weapons is  to kill people.

    #1714798
    Profile photo of don021don021
    Member
    Member since: May 15, 2012
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 1753
    don021

    I have been a “gun nut” all my life, from a very young age when I was given an air rifle and used to shoot blackbirds in orchards in exchange for fruit, to in later years firing many hundreds/thousands of rounds in many types of firearms, including automatic weapons. 24 years in the military had me trained in weapon safety and use. I achieved enough skill to win contests in Hong Kong, top shot in the annual all military shoot, top shot on a Marine range in the U.S.A. and success at Deer Stalkeres Assn. shoots. None of this gave me any wish to own, or shoot, an automatic weapon in civil life, thay are for the military only. Auto loading weapons may be needed by some professional shooters but I do not believe by private shooters.

    #1714806
    Profile photo of arandararandar
    Member
    Member since: November 23, 2009
    Topics: 61
    Replies: 10711
    arandar

    100% support for that, Don.

    But I still wonder why so many people say they need military style firearms?  Why?  To do what?

    Arandar

    #1714829
    Profile photo of Hero42Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 66
    Replies: 11903
    Hero42

    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has announced a ban on all military-style semi-automatic weapons and all assault rifles.

    https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/political/385268/pm-jacinda-ardern-says-new-zealand-will-ban-all-military-style-semi-automatic-weapons-and-all-assault-rifles

    As of 3pm today an order in council took effect. The changes to the regulations would mean the firearms were now catergorised as needing an E-class licence endorsement.

    This means no one will be able to buy the weapons without police approval. Ms Ardern said there was no point in applying for one.

    What struck me most in the report was this:
    “We’re in the dark as to how many of these are in circulation,” Ms Ardern said, referring to the number of weapons the government might have to buy back.

Viewing 10 posts - 21 through 30 (of 40 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Advertisement
 
Join Free.  Register for newsletter updates & complete your membership for full site access.  Welcome & Enjoy!

Register Free today and go in the draw to win a $50 gift card!

Close this Window
 
GrownUps

GrownUps, New Zealand’s best lifestyle website, social club & brain training hub for 50+.

Join 160,000 GrownUps for Free. Register now to receive our regular email newsletters to keep you up to date & complete your membership to access all areas of the site.  We can’t wait to meet you.

Enjoy!

Register Free today and go in the draw to win a $50 gift card!