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Global Warming – what are we doing?

This topic contains 906 replies, has 39 voices, and was last updated by  Bryan > 7 days ago.

Discussions Politics Today Global Warming – what are we doing?

Viewing 10 posts - 831 through 840 (of 907 total)
  • #1724639
    Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 49
    Replies: 11986
    Hero42

    Mommabear
    I don’t know where you got the idea that there would be 4.5 new wind farms for 2019.

    The estimate is that to meet the demand, 4.5 average-sized wind farms, of about 60 turbines each, would have to be built every year, starting in 2025 and finishing by 2050.

    So for future reference starting in 2025 not 2019.

    For those interesting in the facts NZ currently has 19 wind farms, generating 690MW.
    A further 2500MW of wind generation is already consented.

    Figures released by Statistics NZ show that while the country as a whole has not reduced its emissions during the past decade, electricity and gas sector CO2 emissions have declined an impressive 41.7% — a result to which wind power has contributed.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1724748
    Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 49
    Replies: 11986
    Hero42

    A couple of interesting articles:

    We’re nearly half-way through July and time is running out for “true winter” to kick in. That’s the message from weather forecaster WeatherWatch, which says temperatures are rising and New Zealand may have already reached “peak winter”.

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2019/07/weather-time-running-out-for-true-winter-to-kick-in.html

    And on the subject of scarcity of snow:
    The ski fields face a long wait for the natural stuff. MetService is predicting snow still could be a few weeks away.
    With winter snow taking its time to arrive, they’ve been forced into do-it-yourself snow-making. But even that’s still not enough for one popular Wanaka Ski area.

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2019/06/southern-ski-fields-challenged-by-lack-of-snow.html

    Cheers 🙂

    #1725202
    henri
    Member
    Member since: April 18, 2017
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 183
    henri

    Interesting mommabear70 doesn’t know about Wellington.

    Another piece of information.

    😎

    #1725252
    halcyon
    Member
    Member since: May 4, 2014
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 4937
    halcyon

    If we are serious about reducing our carbon footprint then should we be using the internet? The following quote certainly has me asking that question.

    Because while it’s easy to think of the internet as living only on your screen, energy demand for the internet is indeed powered by massive server farms, running around the clock, all over the world. What exactly is the internet’s carbon footprint?

    There are so many hidden contributors to the carbon footprint. While we focus on the obvious we ignore the hidden contributors. Should we be asking how much carbon is generated by this website and is it a necessity to use it?

    Hero, maybe you can consider this as another action you can make in reducing climate change.

    Cheers   🙂

    It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right.

    #1725260
    don021
    Member
    Member since: May 15, 2012
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 1771
    don021

    I was astounded to learn when living in Calafornia a few years ago that it is illegal to hang laundry outside to dry, so it all goes into an electric drier, adding immensly to the bad gas situation. This was long before Trump came on the scene.

    #1725435
    Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 49
    Replies: 11986
    Hero42

    Halycon
    An interesting point.

    According to a report by Gartner, data centres already account for around a quarter of the energy consumed (and the carbon emitted) by the information and communication technology (ICT) sector as a whole. In other words, around half a percent of global CO2 emissions.

    By Gartner’s figures, the world’s PCs and monitors are even more power hungry, accounting for around 40% of the total ICT energy demand and 0.8% of global CO2 emissions. If we decided (somewhat arbitrarily) that half of the emissions from all these laptop and desktop machines were down to internet-based activity, and then add on the emissions from the data centres that make all this online activity possible, then the internet would clock in at around 1% of all the CO2 emissions released from burning fossil fuels.

    So only 1%. But what is the alternative to the internet, paper?

    It’s interesting to note that 1% is about the same proportion as printing and paper-based publishing represents in the UK. Now that is just the UK not the whole world.

    The internet is likely to be crucial to any move to a low-carbon world. Without its capacity to carry the huge flows of energy data, there could be no “smart grid”, for example, and without online video conferencing it would be much harder to reduce the number of business flights in coming years. Ultimately, then, it’s not just technological developments that will affect the growing carbon footprint of the Internet. Just as important is how we choose to use it.

    But you ask about me.

    Across the world there are estimated to be 3.7 billion users of the internet so each one has using a tiny internet carbon footprint.

    So I won’t be limiting my internet use to reduce my carbon footprint as all the alternatives would actually increase it.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1725436
    Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 49
    Replies: 11986
    Hero42

    FDon021
    That law was changed back in 2015. Californians can now dry their clothes outdoors.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1725457
    mommabear70
    Member
    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 1955
    mommabear70

    Henri, what prompted you to say “Interesting mommabear70 doesn’t know about Wellington.” ?

    Just a thought – will you answer or let hero42 answer for you?

     

    #1725460
    paulinem
    Member
    Member since: July 8, 2006
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 974
    paulinem

    Fonterra commits to reducing coal use, pledges recyclable, compostable packaging by 2025
    Anna Whyte1 News Now Politics Reporter

     

    Fonterra has committed to reducing its coal reliance and is looking to have 100 per cent recyclable, reusable and compostable packaging by 2025.

    Robert Spurway of Fonterra said today the company will lower its coal reduction target by 11 years. The company’s targets include reducing emissions of manufacturing operations by 30 per cent by 2030 and becoming net zero by 2050.

    The company wants to drop water use by 20 per cent at manufacturing sites by 2020, create an environment plan for all of its farmers by 2025 and to radically change its packaging.

    It also wants its site in Stirling, Otago to be powered by electricity, not coal. Fonterra has stopped installing new coal boilers.

    “We want to step up our efforts to help New Zealand transition to a zero-carbon economy,” Mr Spurway said.

    “Transitioning Fonterra’s sites away from coal requires a staged approach. We’re determined to go as fast as we can but there are a number of practical challenges we have to overcome.”

    He said some of those challenges include parts of the country’s current energy infrastructure was not up to handling the requirements of Fonterra.

    “There are also cost challenges. Transitioning to cleaner fuels will require additional investment and we need to balance this with remaining competitive. It’s right to take a staged approach.”

    Currently, about 40 per cent of Fonterra’s 32 manufacturing sites are powered by coal, with natural gas, electricity and wood powering the remainder.

    The commitment was welcomed by Government, with Climate Change Minister James Shaw saying Fonterra was “one of the largest users of coal in New Zealand, after the Huntly Power Station, so moving to immediately stop installing new coal boilers and start to convert existing boilers to renewable energy sources is a great step”.

    Energy Minister Megan Woods said Fonterra’s previous pledge was to not install new coal boilers from 2030, “so bringing forward that deadline provides certainty and potentially saves an increase in emissions”.

    “Fonterra’s move serves as a practical example to other industry of the action required to transition from fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy for industrial heat.”

    New Zealand’s Bioenergy Association hoped Fonterra’s commitment would encourage biomass fuel suppliers to increase capacity for sourcing and delivering fuel.

    “Transitioning from use of coal and gas for process heat needs to be done in an orderly manner so that fuel suppliers have time to grow their capacity,” Brian Cox of the association said.

    “These signals from Fonterra will encourage forest owners to see the opportunity for collection and sale of forest harvest residues now that they are having difficulties in selling logs to China.”

     

    Source: Te Karere

    #1725476
    henri
    Member
    Member since: April 18, 2017
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 183
    henri

    Mommabear70

    Why would hero42 answer for me?

    Couple of posts back you questioned hero42’s statement that Wellington was compact.

    If you don’t know how compact Wellington is you must not live there.

    😎

     

Viewing 10 posts - 831 through 840 (of 907 total)

The topic ‘Global Warming – what are we doing?’ is closed to new replies.

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