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Global Warming – what are we doing?

This topic contains 586 replies, has 33 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of mommabear70 mommabear70 12 hours, 23 minutes ago.

Discussions Politics Today Global Warming – what are we doing?

Viewing 10 posts - 521 through 530 (of 587 total)
  • #1707350
    Profile photo of Hero42Hero42
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    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 65
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    Hero42

    Mommabear
    That was a great link on sea level rise.

    Did you realise the opening paragraph says this:

    Sea-level rise is one of the most serious consequences of global warming. No one can really imagine how the coasts will look if the waters rise by several metres over the course of a few centuries. Coastal areas are among the most densely populated regions of the world and are therefore particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. They include major agricultural zones, conurbations and heritage sites. How will climate change affect their appearance? Researchers around the world are seeking answers to the question of how rapidly, and to what extent, sea level will rise as a consequence of climate change. In doing so, they must take account of the fact that sea level is affected not only by the human-induced greenhouse effect but also by natural processes. Experts make a distinction between:
    eustatic causes: this refers to climate-related global changes due to water mass being added to the oceans. The sea-level rise following the melting of large glaciers at the end of ice ages is an example of eustatic sea-level rise;
    isostatic (generally tectonic) causes: these mainly have regional effects. The ice sheets formed during the ice ages are one example. Due to their great weight, they cause the Earth’s crust in certain regions to sink, so sea level rises relative to the land. If the ice melts, the land mass rises once more. This phenomenon can still be observed on the Scandinavian land mass today.

    Or did you choose not to repeat that section. I do check posted links to see if they are correct.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1707352
    Profile photo of Hero42Hero42
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    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 65
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    Hero42

    But wait there is more:

    Go to the second page of your posted link and it says this:

    Measured against the minor changes occurring over the last 6000 years, the global sea-level rise of 18 cm over the course of the last century is considerable. Over the past decade alone, sea level rose by 3.2 cm, according to measurements taken along the coast in the last century and, since 1993, satellite monitoring of the elevation of land and water surfaces worldwide (satellite altimetry).

    There is more for those interested to read it and i shall post the link below for convenience.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1707353
    Profile photo of Hero42Hero42
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    Member since: July 18, 2008
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    Hero42

    There is more but those interested can go and read it for themselves.

    Sea-level rise

    #1707358
    Profile photo of Hero42Hero42
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    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 65
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    Hero42

    Mommabear
    As previously agree David Viner did say “Within a few years winter snowfall will become “a very rare and exciting event” and “Children just aren’t going to know what snow is.””

    But as also previously agreed that statement is so vague as to be meaningless. Where was he talking about? Here in Wellington snow is a rare event, In Auckland it is even rarer.

    Equally well we can consider that this is a statement by one man and as we all know sometimes a person can get it wrong. But that doesn’t mean the science is wrong. What about all the other scientists who disagreed with Viner.

    As climate warms, evaporation from the ocean increases. This results in more water vapour in the air. Globally, atmospheric water vapour has increased by about 5% over the 20th century. Most of the increase has occurred since 1970 (IPCC AR4 3.4.2.1). This is confirmed by satellites that find the total atmospheric moisture content has been increasing since measurements began in 1988 (Santer 2007).

    The extra moisture in the air is expected to produce more precipitation, including more extreme precipitation events. Observations bear this out. A study of precipitation trends over the United States found that heavy precipitation events (over 50mm in a day) have increased 20% over the 20th Century (Groisman 2004). Most of this increase occured after 1970. Various analyses of precipitation over the globe have similarly found a widespread increase in heavy precipitation days since 1950 (Alexander 2006, Groisman 2006).

    Snowstorms can occur if temperatures are in the range of -10°C to 0°C. Global warming decreases the likeliness of snowstorm conditions in warmer, southern regions. However, in northern, colder regions, temperatures are often too cold for very heavy snow so warming can bring more favourable snowstorm conditions (Kunkel 2008). This is borne out in observations. Over the last century, there has been a downward trend in snowstorms across the lower Midwest, South and West Coast. Conversely, there’s been an increase in snowstorms in the upper Midwest East, and Northeast with the overall national trend also upwards (Changnon 2006).

    To claim that record snowfall is inconsistent with a warming world betrays a lack of understanding of the link between global warming and extreme precipitation. Warming causes more moisture in the air which leads to more extreme precipitation events. This includes more heavy snowstorms in regions where snowfall conditions are favourable. Far from contradicting global warming, record snowfall is predicted by climate models and consistent with our expectation of more extreme precipitation events.

    So Viner was partially correct when considering those areas further from the poles as highlighted above.

    But you should really look at the big picture rather than focus on one statement that was vague to say the least.

    Check out those links I have quoted for your further education.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1707360
    Profile photo of paulinempaulinem
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    Member since: July 8, 2006
    Topics: 14
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    paulinem

    Thank you Hero I appreciate your posts very informative and very believable of the reality of climate change, keep them up please as they are very interesting and informative.

     

    #1707429
    Profile photo of Hero42Hero42
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    Member since: July 18, 2008
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    Hero42

    The world is warming faster than we thought.

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/world/2019/01/climate-change-is-speeding-up-ocean-measurements-show.html

    The world’s oceans are heating up faster than previously thought, new research has found.

    Scientists say it’s the strongest sign yet climate change is accelerating, as the heat of the oceans isn’t affected by day-to-day variations in weather, like on land.

    Researchers at the University of California went over four recent papers detailing changes beneath the waves. They found not only are the oceans getting warmer, but the rate of change is speeding up.

    And for the more detailed report behind that:
    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/363/6423/128

    #1707430
    Profile photo of Hero42Hero42
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    Member since: July 18, 2008
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    Hero42

    This was published a few years ago and then updated more recently but is an interesting read all the same:

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/7-answers-to-climate-contrarian-nonsense/

    Cheers 🙂

    #1707492
    Profile photo of mommabear70mommabear70
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    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 1598
    mommabear70

    As old stories are (sometimes) acceptable, here’s another, but it’s not as old as the one advertised in the previous post.

    Global Warming: The method to fake it

    BTW hero42, who agreed with you that Dr Viner’s statement “Children just aren’t going to know what snow is” is so vague as to be meaningless?
    Certainly not I.
    All that spin of yours is meaningless as is the norm for you regarding failed predictions.
    Perhaps you should send a memo to climate and weather spokespeople  that any future prediction announcements should go through you first.

     

     

     

    #1707495
    Profile photo of mommabear70mommabear70
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    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 1598
    mommabear70

    Food for thought regarding statements that:
    climate change is real;
    it is caused by human activity; and
    it is threatening the planet in ways we can only begin to imagine.”

    The first claim is meaningless, since the climate always changes.

    The second claim is that humans are responsible for climate change. But on this planet, climate change has gone on for at least a billion years, and the humans have been here for far less a time then that. So here nothing specific is being said. The IPCC has to learn to speak English to get its message across.

    The third claim is that climate change threatens the planet. The planet is not threatened by climate.
    Humans can be threatened by climate change.
    A cold snap would eventually lead to a drop in CO2 levels.
    A drop in CO2 levels would lead to famine.
    The recurrence of a glacial period could wipe billions of people out, although it might well save our sea life.

    But the planet is un-moved by climate change. The planet has been subject to climate change these last billion plus years. Some say the planet has been around four billion plus years, with the climate always changing.

    So a good starting point to the public relations of this movement would be to start speaking English.
    Although if what the’re saying is nonsense, speaking clear English about it may well give the game away.

    #1707719
    Profile photo of Hero42Hero42
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    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 65
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    Hero42

    Mommabear
    Of course climate changes all the time, no one is saying otherwise.

    What the issue with man made climate change is the rate at which it is changing. The difference is that normally without mans intervention it changes slowly and allows nature to adjust. With mankind’s intervention it is changing rapidly and will have major effect on the life on the planet which will not be good for us in general.

    So it is correct to say the planet won’t be effected if you are talking about the planet as the third rock from the sun and ignoring what lives on the planet but if you define the planet as the entire eco-sphere on the planet then it will be severely effected.

    Cheers 🙂

Viewing 10 posts - 521 through 530 (of 587 total)

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