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Free speech? Hate speech?

This topic contains 282 replies, has 26 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of petrol petrol 3 days, 8 hours ago.

Discussions Politics Today Free speech? Hate speech?

Viewing 10 posts - 271 through 280 (of 283 total)
  • #1690202
    Profile photo of lilith7lilith7
    Member
    Member since: April 9, 2017
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 1489
    lilith7

    Poor parenting may contribute Don,but its far from being the sole cause.

     

    https://tinyurl.com/yaltfjkh

    “Colonialism and Criminal Justice for Indigenous Peoples in
    Australia,Canada, New Zealand and the United States of America.
    Colonial processes impact the involvement of Indigenous Peoples in criminal justice. Despite differences, there is a distinctive pattern that can be seen in the criminal justice systems of the above-given four countries. Indigenous People are over-represented as offenders and victims. ”

    The number of Maori charged with criminal offenses increased six fold
    between 1961 and 1984, but only doubled for non-Maori.
    24
    The rate of prosecutions of Maori compared to non-Maori was much higher than for non-Maori,69 per 1,000 for Maori, compared to 19.3 per 1,000 for non-Maori,
    as well as for convictions with 50.2 percent for Maori and 12.2 percent for non-Maori.
    25

    The impacts of colonization on current Maori marginalization have been
    recognized by scholars, social action groups, and some government committees.
    26
    Despite studies and reports with important recommendations aimed at
    decolonization such as, for example, that the
    Department of Social Welfare should consider “incorporating the values, cultures and beliefs of the Maori people in
    all policies developed for the future of New Zealand,”
    implementation has been met with a consistent lack of resources and “white backlash” such as the abolition of the Department of Maori Affairs and its replacement with a much smaller, policy-only body.

    These ideologies of superiority continue today, not only in school systems,
    but also in the form of racism and stereotyping by members of the criminal
    justice system of Indigenous offenders, victims, and community members
    In New Zealand, there have also been reports of bad relations between the
    police and the Maori as a result of the police demeaning Maori culture, denying
    access to authority, abusing and humiliating Maori people

    Yes,new culturally based criminal justice programs are a good stop-gap, and more cultural sensitivity by non-Indigenous service providers is certainly desirable.”

     

    #1690207
    Profile photo of don021don021
    Member
    Member since: May 15, 2012
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 1552
    don021

    The number of Maori charged with criminal offences increased six fold between 1961 and 1984——
    The figures speak for themselves don’t they! Sorry lilith7, for whatever the reason the problem is still there.

    #1690347
    Profile photo of sir-nigel-gresleysir-nigel-gresley
    Member
    Member since: January 10, 2017
    Topics: 3
    Replies: 880
    sir-nigel-gresley

    I know a great number of Maori who have done well. Colonization is an age-old excuse. There has been more cultural sensitivity provided than ever.

    On another note as the previous comments have gone off track. I hear Paulene Hansen from Australia, is coming over to speak on free speech. Should be interesting.  😎

    Happy Valley

    #1690358
    Profile photo of farmer008farmer008
    Member
    Member since: August 10, 2012
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 89
    farmer008

    About time we stopped this nonsense about feeling guilty at being white.

    If it had not been for the entrepreneurship of the White race, we would not be living in the luxuriousness of today with all its mod-cons.

    #1690362
    Profile photo of mommabear70mommabear70
    Member
    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 1260
    mommabear70

    farmer, in all probability, inhabitants would still be living in grass huts and eating each other even more once the wildlife had been demolished.
    Who owes who you think?

     

    #1690379
    Profile photo of huiatahihuiatahi
    Member
    Member since: March 22, 2017
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 644
    huiatahi

    The two posts above just don’t bear commenting on.

    huiatahi

    #1690387
    Profile photo of gabyonegabyone
    Member
    Member since: November 13, 2008
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 2545
    gabyone

    Certainly some very offensive & judgemental speech on here.

     

    Gabyone Auckland region

    #1690423
    Profile photo of mommabear70mommabear70
    Member
    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 1260
    mommabear70

    farmer, I see nothing offensive with your post. I thank our Lord everyday for shelter, warm clothes and nourishment He has provided.
    My post in reply wasn’t aimed at any particular race or country either.

    Differences of opinion are part of human nature.

    Cannabilism isn’t against ‘the law’ anywhere in the world. I’d say there are many groups of humans throughout the world who whether by choice or not, still live in what we’d call ‘primitive’ conditions. Cooked human flesh is said by some to taste not dissimilar to pork. I say each to their own.
    But if we were discussing a ‘decent way of life’ here in New Zealand, I’d imagine most people would prefer to live in a ‘civilised’ manner. But while civilisation introduced by the ‘White Race’ brought much luxuriousness, it also brought a lot of misery – firearms is a good example. ‘Christianity’ isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but in my opinion it’s way better than the law of the jungle.
    There’s much to be desired from both ‘camps’.

    I’m sure you’re aware that there’s quite a few pot and kettle types around, those perfectly willing to throw mud as and when they feel the urge but get a bit uppity when they see something they’re offended by coming the other way.
    Interpretations and opinions is everything and part of human nature which is why free speech must never be outlawed.
    I’ve seen plenty of posts I’d deem offensive, some even personalised, I choose to ignore.
    Commenting on every post isn’t compulsory.
    Sometimes better to ignore than pass judgement.

    #1690426
    Profile photo of petrolpetrol
    Member
    Member since: August 5, 2018
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 11
    petrol

    I would be prepared to give the squeaky liberal leftie some credit if they  treated all political leaders and despots equally

    But no.

    They get on the streets and demonstrate against Donald Trumps election , but a word against the election of Erdogan in Turkey

    They demonstrate against the actions of Israel in the Middle east ,but never against the treatment of women in the Palestinian territories or Saudi Arabia or every other Arab nation

    They never got on the streets to protest against Putin’s annexation of the Crimea or of Putin’s treatment of minorities and women

    Their aim is to destroy western freedom and as we have seen lately with anti Don Brash demos

    Maybe as some have said ,they should be outside the TVNZ  studios demanding equal rights for minority languages .

    Using Maori expressions and ignoring Asian and Islander expressions is pure racism.

    When i see them demanding true equality in all aspects of society .then they may gain some respect.

    #1690427
    Profile photo of lilith7lilith7
    Member
    Member since: April 9, 2017
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 1489
    lilith7

    Its always so interesting when those commenting on Maori bring up the subject of cannibalism. 🙄  🙄

    Its generally referenced by those keen to disparage Maori,portraying them as undeveloped & ignorant. Which is somewhat ironic,given the following facts:

     

    https://tinyurl.com/9jxa

    “Cannibalism Normal For Early Humans?
    By John Roach
    for National Geographic News
    April 10, 2003

    Summary: Genetic markers commonly found in modern humans all over the world could be evidence that our earliest ancestors were cannibals, according to new research. Scientists suggest that even today many of us carry a gene that evolved as protection against brain diseases that can be spread by eating human flesh.
    The brain diseases, called prion diseases, are characterized by loss of coordination, dementia, paralysis, and eventually death. Modern examples include Creutzfeld Jacob disease and kuru in humans, and mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, in animals.
    Fried human, barbecued human, broiled human, raw human…were these items on the menu of the day for our prehistoric ancestors? Quite possibly, according to genetic researchers.”

     

    And then of course,there’s the royal connection to cannibalism:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1389142/British-royalty-dined-human-flesh-dont-worry-300-years-ago.html

    “They have long been famed for their love of lavish banquets and rich recipes. But what is less well known is that the British royals also had a taste for human flesh.
    A new book on medicinal cannibalism has revealed that possibly as recently as the end of the 18th century British royalty swallowed parts of the human body.

    The author adds that this was not a practice reserved for monarchs but was widespread among the well-to-do in Europe.

    Even as they denounced the barbaric cannibals of the New World, they applied, drank, or wore powdered Egyptian mummy, human fat, flesh, bone, blood, brains and skin.
    Moss taken from the skulls of dead soldiers was even used as a cure for nosebleeds, according to Dr Richard Sugg at Durham University.

    Dr Sugg said: ‘The human body has been widely used as a therapeutic agent with the most popular treatments involving flesh, bone or blood.

    ‘Cannibalism was found not only in the New World, as often believed, but also in Europe.’One thing we are rarely taught at school yet is evidenced in literary and historic texts of the time is this: James I refused corpse medicine; Charles II made his own corpse medicine; and Charles I was made into corpse medicine.

    ‘Along with Charles II, eminent users or prescribers included Francis I, Elizabeth I’s surgeon John Banister, Elizabeth Grey, Countess of Kent, Robert Boyle, Thomas Willis, William III, and Queen Mary.'”

     

     

     

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