Eruptions from the past

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  • #176319
    Profile photo of Kelpie
    Kelpie
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    Member since: November 26, 2006
    Topics: 19
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    Do any of you have those sudden eruptions of a word you haven’t heard for over half a century?
    Today out of the blue came Flivver—must be 60 odd years ago I last heard that.
    Did any of you have one in your family?

    #176321
    Profile photo of orca47
    orca47
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    Member since: November 15, 2007
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    Some of the words we used to use have quite a different meaning, do you remember the half dollar (2/6p), my old mate the panel beater said it would cost me two “spot” to fix the dent in the car, that had me worried it ended up meaning $200, mind you petrol at 3/3p a gallon and milk at 4p a pint delivered and butter at two bob (2/-) a pound wasn’t half bad, you can guess I am a baby boomer (1947), sometimes I will say things to the younger workers and then I remember I am using some old phrase from the past, the bewilderment on their faces wondering what this old bugger really means 🙂

    #176323
    Profile photo of Emelle
    Emelle
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    Member since: December 5, 2006
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    I have always liked the word ‘Ritzy’-it somehow evokes glamour,cheekiness,and exuberant energy of people who are not necessarily rich(BB 1941)
    Emelle.

    #176325
    Profile photo of oldkiwikid
    oldkiwikid
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    Member since: November 26, 2006
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    When I was a kid, butter was 2/-. Once I was given back 6d change as the shopkeeper mistook the 2/- for a half crown. Every time after that I carefully put the 2/- face up on the counter hoping it might happen again but it never did.
    Flippertygibbet is another word that came to mind from long ago. I have a friend and I am sure my grandmother would have described her in that way.

    #176327
    Profile photo of Mona
    Mona
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    Member since: February 2, 2007
    Topics: 46
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    Gobbledygook.Starting from scratch.[scratch what]Higgeldepigalty
    Hell its a wonder we learnt to spell correctly OKK[well thats debatable in my case]

    #176329
    Profile photo of Bryan
    Bryan
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    Member since: October 28, 2006
    Topics: 14
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    A friend of mine running a small business made a piece of equipment from bits and pieces as he was unable to buy what he wanted. When he showed his staff how it worked he said “It’s a bit ‘Heath Robinson’ but it will do the job” most of the staff wanted to know who ‘Heath Robinson’ was!

    At Home, At Peace and Causing Trouble In South Taranaki

    #176331
    Profile photo of Mona
    Mona
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    Member since: February 2, 2007
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    Me tooo?????

    #176333
    Profile photo of Bryan
    Bryan
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    Member since: October 28, 2006
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    Heath Robinson = something "gerry built" or home built, rough and ready that does the job ok.

    Here’s another one "Mickey Duck" means any comic book in the Navy. A take off of the names Mickey Mouse & Donald Duck.

    At Home, At Peace and Causing Trouble In South Taranaki

    #176335
    Profile photo of Emelle
    Emelle
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    Member since: December 5, 2006
    Topics: 59
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    Aha-yes-but WHO was’Heath Robinson ?
    I remember that Mickey Doolans were Catholics.
    Emelle

    #176337
    Profile photo of Bryan
    Bryan
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    Member since: October 28, 2006
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    A non existent person to the best of my knowledge, it is a term my grand farther used so it has been around for a while.

    At Home, At Peace and Causing Trouble In South Taranaki

    #176339
    Profile photo of Mona
    Mona
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    Member since: February 2, 2007
    Topics: 46
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    My Grandfathers favourite saying was blarney.He used it as a replacement for a swear word.Like the Blarney Government is going to the dogs,Julia[my Grandmother]That was years and years ago,and that statement STILL applies.

    #176341
    Profile photo of Chinadoll
    Chinadoll
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    Member since: July 19, 2006
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    Hi there.

    Heath Robinson was a real person. I am pretty sure that he came from Britain.He put out a book full of amazing wonderful machines
    They were drawings only, but a real joy to look at. I remember getting the book from thye library in the 60s.

    China Doll

    #176343
    Profile photo of Bryan
    Bryan
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    Member since: October 28, 2006
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    Welcome China Doll, and thank you for the information. As I said it was a saying I had heard around for years and years but I didn’t know if it was a person or not.

    At Home, At Peace and Causing Trouble In South Taranaki

    #176345
    Profile photo of bobbity
    bobbity
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    Member since: September 14, 2006
    Topics: 38
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    Hi China doll and welcome to the discussions.

    Ramona, blarney is Irish for lying.
    An old Irish saying is “he kissed the blarney stone this morning”, meaning he was telling lies. So I guess the blarney government meant the ‘lying government’

    #176347
    Profile photo of Mona
    Mona
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    Member since: February 2, 2007
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    AAh so that was the meaning to that statement,He jolly well meant it too.Thanks Bobbity.

    #176349
    Profile photo of bobbity
    bobbity
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    Member since: September 14, 2006
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    You’re welcome ramona.!

    #176351
    Profile photo of Emelle
    Emelle
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    Member since: December 5, 2006
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    I once heard a famous Irish singer visiting NZ explain the difference between Blarney and Baloney:he said"If you tell a beautiful woman she is beautiful,that’s Blarney,and if you tell an ugly woman she is beautiful,that’s Baloney" I take it that Blarney is a gushing,superlative way of talking-a sort of ‘gift of the gab’

    Emelle.

    #176353
    Profile photo of bobbity
    bobbity
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    Member since: September 14, 2006
    Topics: 38
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    Thats interesting Emelle..I wish I could speak these languages to have an understanding.
    i’m wondering now about the true meaning.
    PS so i looked it up and it seems it is a form of ‘deceit’

    http://www.irelandseye.com/blarney/blarney.shtm

    Blarney is celebrated the world over for a stone on the parapet that is said to endow whoever kisses it with the eternal gift of eloquence (in Irish ‘solabharthact’) – the ‘Gift of the Gab’. The origin of this custom is unknown, though the word “blarney”, meaning to placate with soft talk or to deceive without offending, probably derives from the stream of unfulfilled promises of Cormac MacDermot MacCarthy to the Lord President of Munster in the late sixteenth century. Having seemingly agreed to deliver his castle to the Crown, he continuously delayed doing so with soft words, which came to be known as “Blarney talk”.

    #176355
    Profile photo of Mona
    Mona
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    Member since: February 2, 2007
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    Thank you again Bobbity,the origination of this word amazes me.Is there anyother words that anyone has,that needs to know their origins to.This is another way of educating my underfed brain as well.

    #176357
    Profile photo of bobbity
    bobbity
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    Member since: September 14, 2006
    Topics: 38
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    do you know how surnames came about Ramona?

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