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Education in Crisis

This topic contains 23 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of halcyon halcyon 5 days, 6 hours ago.

Discussions Politics Today Education in Crisis

Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 24 total)
  • #1701860
    Profile photo of halcyonhalcyon
    Member
    Member since: May 4, 2014
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 4665
    halcyon

    And that last post epitomises exactly what I am trying to highlight. NZ education levels have fallen down from near the top to somewhere around  30th place.

    Of cause the easiest target is the previous government. Many is the moan about how they have underfunded education. But is that the cause of our poor performance?

    Remember, children spend more time in the home environment than they ever do in the school environment. Secondly, children spend the early years in the home. Therefore parents are well positioned to assist their children develop good skills that will help the child in their education.

    Surely it is time we started to focus in on the home environment rather than just focusing in on the school environment. Without improving the parent-child interaction the teacher-child interaction will not improve.

    I behave therefore I am.
    (Apologies to B F Skinner and Rene Descartes)

    #1701861
    Profile photo of jennifer128355jennifer128355
    Member
    Member since: January 13, 2018
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 372
    jennifer128355

    Just a question Halcyon….back in 1978 when I came to the US, the schools didn’t have any idea on which class to put my girls in, coz they were so advanced.  They were aged, 11, 9, 6.  They were on the honor roll each marking period for a couple of years.  The principal and teachers said that NZ used some other system.  Now I can’t remember the name they called it?  My question is, has the system of teaching changed from the early ’70’s?

    #1701879
    Profile photo of halcyonhalcyon
    Member
    Member since: May 4, 2014
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 4665
    halcyon

    Our education has changed greatly since that time. I was speaking to an ex-Principal today. She started teaching in 1973. Her first class was of 40 children. And while there were the occasional dummies in the classes there were no behaviour problems.

    There was the expectation that all children could read and write by the time they got to Form 2 (now called Year 8). Unfortunately that is no longer the case.

    These days there is less focus on the basics, like holding a pencil properly and on sentence structure. Methods of teaching literacy and maths have changed. Consequently we have children coming into high school  (Year 9 students) who still do not know how to structure a sentence.

    In those days NZ was a leader in education. Unfortunately we are now near the bottom of the countries that make up the OECD.

    As is being demonstrated on this thread, behaviour is becoming the greatest handicap to learning. And that is a function of parents not knowing how to parent.

    I behave therefore I am.
    (Apologies to B F Skinner and Rene Descartes)

    #1701882
    Profile photo of jennifer128355jennifer128355
    Member
    Member since: January 13, 2018
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 372
    jennifer128355

    Thank you Halcyon for your rapid response.  I so agree with you, its the parents responsibility to instill on their children the basics of learning.

    What a shame NZ has gone so down hill with public schooling, that parents would maybe have to think private.? Not only for education but the whole environment.   Have to go to bed.  Take care

    p.s.  Maybe they just took after their Mother….hahahaha just jokes!

    #1702103
    Profile photo of mommabear70mommabear70
    Member
    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 1505
    mommabear70

    halcyon, perhaps a lot of members are out enjoying the sun because I can’t see any posts on all the great things that the current Government is doing.

    How do you feel about the proposal of scrapping English tests for foreign teachers?
    I’d call it crazy.
    Any teacher that can’t converse in good English is no use to our children.
    In our experience, what usually happens when talking to someone from a foreign country when English is not their first language is, on hearing a tricky question for example, their natural reaction is to somehow self-translate to their native language, reconvert that back to english in their head and then fumble out something they think answers the question. This type of event is likely at every level of education.

    Some Teaching Council spokesperson said they are now “reviewing its language requirements to make them more tailored to the teaching environment and to all cultures”.

    I wonder what ‘more tailored to all cultures’ actually means?
    Children still have to be taught in English, no matter what they are studying.
    Even if they are learning Japanese, they still need a teacher that can explain things in English.

    I know there’s a chronic teacher shortage but this approach doesn’t work for me.

    #1702107
    Profile photo of mommabear70mommabear70
    Member
    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 1505
    mommabear70

    Here’s a comment from someone I’m not naming off a popular News Site I’m not naming. In the words of member Bryan, who other members have no problem with that I can see, “if you don’t like it, tough”.

    “This is not madness but absolute stupidity.
    Back in the mid late 90s we had a teacher shortage, and imported large numbers where accents where strong (sth African in some cases) and indian.. Fiji india, being the main sources.
    The result was most of these teachers, espec where english was not their native language, went to low decile schools..
    These primary schools then had a huge drop , from an already general lower performance level in student achievement. Students would sit thru classes with little if any understanding as to what was being put in front of them.
    The moment the student fails to understand the accent / poor grammar, they go into dream time for the rest of the year.
    Students who are bored.. be high performers or fail to grasp ideas, become disruptive in class, playground, and outside. Truancy rises with further social issues.

    To top it off they then put the blame on the education methods of teaching, systems, school structures…
    English is our prime official language, Maori and sign behind.
    Its not rocket science to see if we put teachers in the front of our students who cant speak our primary language and/or have poor grammar, and/or thick accents, our education system is going to fail our children dramatically even more.

    And we wonder why low decile, and sections of our community have poor reading / writing/ basic maths skills in our work place and classrooms today.

    This Government talks about human rights…
    Every Child in NZ has the right to education.. that also means teachers that can communicate with their students regardless of culture.”

    #1702390
    Profile photo of petrolpetrol
    Member
    Member since: August 5, 2018
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 32
    petrol

    Those who demand culture should be allowed drown in it

    Give the rest of us the freedom to expand our horizons through education.

    #1702437
    Profile photo of henrihenri
    Member
    Member since: April 18, 2017
    Topics: 2
    Replies: 121
    henri

    Mommabear70

    Thats good of you to say and I quote “all the great things that the current Government is doing.”

    No need for me to add anything.

    #1702495
    Profile photo of halcyonhalcyon
    Member
    Member since: May 4, 2014
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 4665
    halcyon

    According to MSM News today:-

    Year 13 history students fear they may fail their exam because many didn’t know the meaning of the word ‘trivial‘.”

    Now these students have been in our education system for 13 years, yet they claim they do not know the meaning of a basic word. And these same students will be attending Uni or seeking work next year. Not a good look.

    I behave therefore I am.
    (Apologies to B F Skinner and Rene Descartes)

    #1702498
    Profile photo of mommabear70mommabear70
    Member
    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 1505
    mommabear70

    Good luck with job interviews.
    The first question asked of applicants may be ‘Please give us examples using the word ‘trivial.’

     

     

     

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