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Education in Crisis

This topic contains 17 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of henri henri 1 hour, 58 minutes ago.

Discussions Politics Today Education in Crisis

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 18 total)
  • #1696261
    Profile photo of paulinempaulinem
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    Member since: July 8, 2006
    Topics: 14
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    paulinem

    Horror stories fail to shift Education Ministry on the right to restrain

    </header>

    NZ Herald 20 September 2018
    Family First Comment: This article makes shocking reading – and shows why schools are struggling to find teachers. Who wants to work in this type of jungle-environment?
    A Far North principals’ association president was hoping a Ministry of Education meeting in Wellington on Friday to review guidelines on the restraint of children, would result in change. He was disappointed.
    “The Mad Hatters are now in control of our classrooms,” said Te Tai Tokerau Principals’ Association president Pat Newman.
    He had advised his members to hope and pray that those making the decisions would “actually apply common sense for once” to they had been facing since the guidelines were imposed.
    “A teacher is not even allowed to lift a five-year-old up and carry them out [of the classroom] when they throw things in the middle of a tantrum.
    “Instead, we are supposed to leave them and remove all the other children,” he said.

    Then there were:
    * The Year 2 boy who urinated on the floor in front the class as an act of defiance, swore and spat at the teacher, destroyed classroom property, on occasion screamed for long periods of time, hit and kicked the teacher and other pupils.
    He refused to leave the classroom when asked to, the teacher repeatedly facing the choice of allowing him to remain and potentially continue his disruptive behaviour, or taking the classroom outside “again”.

    School locked down three times
    * Several incidents with an eight-year-old who smashed windows/punched holes in the bathroom walls. Students/staff placed in lockdown on three occasions until he calmed down.The child’s ‘psychologist,’ who used to see him occasionally, asked us write a review of each incident so they could justify putting anger management strategies in place.

    Won’t get out of cars
    * We have had at least five instances of parents unable to get children out of their car or into class this term. On two occasions, the parent eventually left the school with the child.
    * “I have had three this term who have refused to get out of the car when Mum has arrived to drop them off. Not long ago, I would have lifted them out of the car and told the parent to drive away. Now all I can say to the parent is that it is your challenge, you get them out and to class and we will take over.”
    READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12128520

     

    • This topic was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Profile photo of paulinem paulinem.
    #1701746
    Profile photo of mommabear70mommabear70
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    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 1435
    mommabear70

    Alwyn Poole writes:
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/politics/news/article.cfm?c_id=280&objectid=12155888

    “The New Zealand education system is in major trouble.
    The gaps between New Zealand’s Asian population (67 per cent of school leavers with UE), European (44 per cent), Pasifika (22 per cent) and Maori (19 per cent) are a national disgrace and we have given up on believing it can be different.”

    That’s a shocking disparity.

    We are sliding rapidly in international measures and our schools are among the worst in the OECD for closing the gaps. Socio-economic advantage has a stronger impact on achievement in New Zealand than many OECD countries.”
    Our best university is no longer in the top 100 in the world. Teacher’s training is a mess — the entry bar far too low for primary training and the opportunity cost of another year without pay means the best university graduates won’t even give teaching a second thought.

    The latest pay rounds have turned into massive whine-fests and many teachers are simply putting off anyone looking for a positive profession to be involved in.

    We have not recognised how the world has changed. If the education system was once a performance car it was built in the 1950s.

    Our ageing teaching population, our massive educational bureaucracy, many of the failing schools, the teacher unions, bizarre social media sites and blinkered politicians who use slogans and parrot nonsense to attempt to impress those in their own bubble, all lost the plot over 12 out of 2600 schools.
    It came to a head in Parliament when some politicians felt they were naming and shaming these individuals and organisations in the House. One said that they had treated children “like dogs” and the Minister of Education even used the word “dodgy”.
    The messages: If you are an educator who thinks there may be different ways of doing things, keep your head well down. To families; you better hope that your child fits the one-size-fits-all model or that you have enough financial means to make some choices in terms of where you live or schools you can access.
    To those that don’t — including many of our Maori and Pasifika families — the inequities will be perpetuated in succeeding generations.”

    The vested interests couldn’t handle 12 schools that succeeded in trying a different model.

    #1701754
    Profile photo of halcyonhalcyon
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    Member since: May 4, 2014
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    halcyon

    International research shows that the Charter School model can provide better outcomes on average than State Schools for those from minority groups who are normally marginalised in main stream education.  Even in the short time the Partnership schools were in existence here they showed promise.

    But rather than getting sidetracked into a philosophical debate over whether or not education should be privatised, why not deconstruct the information that has been provided by our experiment.

    By looking at the main point of difference between Charter Schools and State Schools one is drawn to the differing amount of input by parents  between models. To be enrolled in a Charter School parents needed to demonstrate a keenness for their child to attend the school. Part of the enrollment process required the parent to be willing to meet regularly with the school. This to a greater degree than the State system. According to a SENCO from the local high-school  they often have difficulty in arranging meeting with parents whose children are failing to progress educationally.

    Therefore may be it is time that we explored what role the home life plays in the learning performance of children.

    I behave therefore I am.
    (Apologies to B F Skinner and Rene Descartes)

    #1701769
    Profile photo of mommabear70mommabear70
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    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 7
    Replies: 1435
    mommabear70

    Indeed halcyon, I’d be appalled that any parents can’t find the time to check on and assist with homework as an example.

     

    #1701794
    Profile photo of Hero42Hero42
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    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 65
    Replies: 11363
    Hero42

    And let’s not forget that the children coming out of schools this year have been in a school system presided over and underfunded by National for nine years.

    These poor results are more a National legacy rather than a Labour issue. Labour have after all only been in power for a year and it takes a long time to turn around something like this. But Labour are committed to correcting National’s mistakes and we should see improvements in the coming years and decades.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1701795
    Profile photo of Hero42Hero42
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    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 65
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    Hero42

    On the subject of NZ charter schools if memory serves me correctly the recent report into their success commissioned by National was not a glowing success story.

    But to be fair National didn’t ask for the research to look at all aspects so it might have been even worse than reported.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1701808
    Profile photo of halcyonhalcyon
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    Member since: May 4, 2014
    Topics: 9
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    halcyon

    True Hero. Unfortunately our Charter Schools were not operating long enough for a wide range of data to be collected. However there are  examples where groups children, who have been going through our State Education system, have exceeded the performance of the mean for their cohort. One such group had 95% or better in gaining NCEA level 2. The mean for their cohort is around the mid 70’s. It is these groups that are my focus. IF they can do this then is there any reason why others can not emulate this success. Surely this is what our educators should be exploring.

    Cheers  🙂

    I behave therefore I am.
    (Apologies to B F Skinner and Rene Descartes)

    #1701831
    Profile photo of TedETedE
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    Member since: May 6, 2006
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 2167
    TedE

    While I sympathize with the anti smacking lobby and concede that they are well meaning. I think that the situation in schools as described is not going to go away while this hands off edict is adhered to.

    Realistically the teacher must be supported in removing the disruptive child. Granted there needs to then be a realistic approach to addressing the problem which is going to mean more non-teaching time for the teacher.

    The charter school problem can go away quite easily with them becoming schools of special character and continue their good work and those that are based on the education as a business are welcome to return to the USofA.

    I am a firm believer that education is not confined to schools and is something that you continue throughout your life. That is why the teachers that handle the new entrants are the most important. Teachers who can instil that yearning for learning are the important ones and that is where the higher salaries need to be. The primary school teachers are undervalued in my opinion. What to do about it?

    Do any of you remember Ivan Illich’s books “Deschooling Society” and “Tools for Conviviality”? They are still relevant.

    TedE - Papakura -

    #1701855
    Profile photo of paulinempaulinem
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    Member since: July 8, 2006
    Topics: 14
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    paulinem
    Southland school principal warns of ‘hidden crisis
    David Mckenzie, principal of Edendale Primary School, says children are entering the school system without an understanding of the word no.
    David Mckenzie, principal of Edendale Primary School, says children are entering the school system without an understanding of the word no.

    A Southland school principal has warned of a “hidden crisis” facing New Zealand in the form of ill disciplined children.
    Edendale Primary School principal David McKenzie said an emerging group of children were entering the school system, or were already in it, who had never understood the word no.
    They had little ability to manage difficult situations without resorting to tantrums or violence which disrupted others in the classroom.
    Classrooms were based on the foundations of respect  for each other and co-operation with each other.
    “If we don’t have those two things in play by the age of five, teachers can’t do their job.
    “This is the hidden crisis our nation is facing,” he said.
    Some of the settings around how children were raised had changed, he said.
    “The anti smacking law has been interpreted as the anti discipline law.”
    There was a real concern at the challenging behaviours shown by children; it was getting worse and there was  no quick fix, he said.
    He suggested another model may need to be found for children who struggled to cope in the classroom environment.
    Children were entering school who weren’t socially ready for the rigours of the classroom and were unable to form positive relationships with their classmates and teachers.
    “If they aren’t ready, the classroom won’t work because the child is being counter-productive.”
    Parents should have dealt with their childrens tantrums by the time they entered school, he said.
    They needed to ensure their children were responsible, respectful and socially robust by the age of five so they could cope with the rigours of the classroom.
    McKenzie said three quarters of brain development was in the first three years of a person’s life.
    “If we don’t get that right we are undermining our children’s futures for their entire lives.”
    Southland Primary Principals Association president Wendy Ryan confirmed more and more children were entering the school system with behavioural issues.
    Behaviours included children hitting other children, spitting at people and throwing furniture, she said.
    She was not saying such behaviours never happened before, but it was now happening more often.
    A Ministry of Education spokeswoman said the rates of stand-down, suspension and exclusion for 5 and 6 year olds went up in 2017.
    Another ministry spokeswoman said it recognised schools could face real challenges in supporting children with challenging behaviour.
    However, evidence showed that positive behaviour was learned, she said.
    The ministry offered a range of services and supports to help schools develop positive learning environments, she said.
    It was expanding its behaviour services to reach an extra 1000 children aged 0 to 8 years per year.
    “By intervening earlier, we are aiming to support more children onto a more pro-social pathway.”
    University of Otago associate dean in teacher education, Dr Alex Gunn, who is an early childhood teacher by profession, said young children had to learn to adapt to the cultural context of schools, and it took time.
    Teachers had to moderate their expectations and work with individuals as needed, she said.
    Teachers were generally skilled at doing this, while carefully designed transition to school programmes helped immensely.
    When teachers worked with children and families to make the expectations and standards in the classroom visible, children learned to adjust, including those with health, social and development challenges, she said.
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/108475426/southland-school-principal-warns-of-hidden-crisis

    • This reply was modified 5 days, 6 hours ago by Profile photo of paulinem paulinem.
    #1701856
    Profile photo of paulinempaulinem
    Member
    Member since: July 8, 2006
    Topics: 14
    Replies: 629
    paulinem

    I am very sorry the last post I copy pasted from stuff BUT  it doesnt allow me to EDIT it with all the extra rubbish on it if someone can suggest how I would appreciate

    As you can see I found the editing tool in a weird place but I have now edited the above post  hopefully good 🙂

    • This reply was modified 5 days, 6 hours ago by Profile photo of paulinem paulinem.
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