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Democracy evolution – The Next Bold Step

This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of jens jens > 7 days ago.

Discussions Politics Democracy evolution – The Next Bold Step

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  • #1716047
    Profile photo of maxjohnmaxjohn
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    Member since: November 5, 2016
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    maxjohn

    Citizens living in democracies worldwide have frequently been sidelined as politicians stonewalled unpopular decisions and passed popular laws. When scrutinised in hindsight the results are often seen to have negatively impacted today’s societies. Lobbyists play a part by securing near term benefits for themselves with scant regards for future consequences. Because election cycles are a major cause of this problem today’s political discussions should be directed towards assuring the future well-being of all citizens are accounted for, including those yet to be born. Ancient civilisations lived by laws that ensured as far as possible they did not impact on the wellbeing of future generations. Some Native American people planned for seven generations in the future, whilst for Australia’s First People it was for eternity.

     

    Finland, Wales and Japan have each employed different methods to address the election cycle shortcoming. Japan has been conducting research to ascertain the best design in developing a National Ministry of the Future and Department of Future in Local Governments. Guided by the principle of looking to build a secure and sustainable future for Wales, the Well Being for Future Generations Act was given Royal Assent in April 2015. Finland in 1993 established a Standing Permanent Committee, underpinned by the constitution, consisting of 17 parliamentarians representing all parties. They claim that among their greatest impacts to date is the changing of Finnish politics mindsets towards considering long term future options. The Japanese research supports that claim. Groups of citizens when asked in 2015 to draw-up a vision for the future were asked to stand in the shoes of those who would be active in 2060. Their vision compelled effort is taken to overcome tough issues. Groups without the active in 2060 instruction incorporated existing constraints and challenges into their vision.

     

    Aotearoa has a proud history of leading political change to ensure all its citizens can participate in deciding what rules will be adopted nationally and in local municipalities. It is time to provide the silent future constituents of New Zealand with a voice so the world they want to live in is accounted for by today’s politicians.

    #1716376
    Profile photo of jensjens
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    Member since: May 3, 2006
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    jens

    Makes sense, maxjohn.

    Since  our  leading welfare politics have not eliminated  poverty  amidst   plenty  but even widened  welfare dependency (i.e. relative  poverty ?) – and yet  there is  no clear  political  vision  on how to rectify  it in a fair  way so far (???)  –

    should we not vigorously discuss the  pros and  cons  of the Third Way  upwards  for all towards at  least a minimally meaningful level of  personal wealth ownership  by all citizens eventually, maxjohn ?   Or why not ?

    And what about  another initial  step in this direction  (beside the NZ Super Fund)  –

    granting the $1000.- KiwiSaver kick-start  to all those who have not received it  yet, unconditionally,  “from cradle to grave”,  which  would  be no new  taxpayer  expense if granted as  an investment  within the  NZ Super Fund out of the money we all have  saved, paid and collectively own already with the NZSF?

    If you agree with  those who for unexplained  reasons do not  want  to know and talk about it, perhaps  you can give at lest  your  own  reasons  for such an attitude, and be  prepared to discuss it ?

     

     

    #1720008
    Profile photo of jensjens
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    Member since: May 3, 2006
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    jens

    Well maxjohn and others  interested in a long term  vision of  democratic  evolution  for the  future

    –   should we  go back to the  “eternally sustainable”  culture of our pre- stone-age  ancestors or  “pre-colonial”   Australia’s First People  –  or what ?

    Surely at least the Greens  might  have something to  propose  for  discussion  on the  next  bold step in the  direction of their  vision?

    #1720014
    Profile photo of maxjohnmaxjohn
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    Member since: November 5, 2016
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    maxjohn

    We have just seen the report of how dysfunctional parliament performance is, and that it is expected to take 5 years to change the culture. My research indicates it takes 7 years to change culture in large organizations. That aside, having a process in place that takes account of the future welfare of citizens does mean in part having eternal sustainability. Introducing such an ideology into our political environment could further exacerbate the issues faced by those working in parliament. Maybe the way forward is to have the politicians explain to us what their vision is for New Zealand for the next several decades. Then provide check points along the way so as to allow us to gauge the progress made towards that vision. At the moment all we really have is a rear view mirror telling us where we have been which is a ludicrous situation.

    #1720040
    Profile photo of jensjens
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    Member since: May 3, 2006
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    jens

    Sounds  good,  maxjohn  –  but  the reality seems to be,  that the  majority of people  are  so conservative as to “prefer the  devil  they know to the one they don’t know”.

    Examples of this are the modest proportion of  votes achieved by the Greens, or even the  recent elections in Australia, where  innovative Labour  lost to the more  conservative  (Centrist?) Liberals.

    Here I believe  Labour will retain  the leading  role as long as it remains  more  “Centrist”  and economically   conservative than unpredictable  extreme  liberalism – or  excessively  freedom and enterprise curtailing  govt.  monopoly  capitalism.

    For ordinary politicians to go for  votes,  their best  chance is not only  to discover what  people want or  wish, but  also how far  are they prepared  to  participate  in the  efforts to  achieve it.

    Therefore,  maxjohn  –  would not  vigorous non-party public  debate and discussions  be  very helpful  for politicians to get  ideas  and  clues for  coming up  with innovative policy proposals ?

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