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AFFORDABLE Housing Crisis.

This topic contains 551 replies, has 25 voices, and was last updated by  aislingadmin > 7 days ago.

Discussions Politics Today AFFORDABLE Housing Crisis.

Viewing 10 posts - 381 through 390 (of 552 total)
  • #1683308
    lilith7
    Member
    Member since: April 9, 2017
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 2029
    lilith7

    “The fact of this matter is simply that National believes utterly in private and individual enterprise and does not believe in a strong public service or social equity.

     

    Yes exactly Arandar;that is what it comes down to. I believe their long term plan was to privatise housing here – there’s money to be made & nothing must be permitted to stand in the way – being the attitude. The very last thing thing the previous govt was concerned with was the well being of their fellow Kiwis;they were interested only in how much money could be made from them.

     

    “In the middle of a massive housing crisis, National used this to reduce the social housing stock … evicting tenants, leaving houses empty, demolishing others, refurbishing few and building almost none … they grew the housing crisis in fact, while at the same time denying there even was one.”

    Indeed – & so very obvious is that,that all but their most dyed-in-the-wool supporters have no other course but to admit that.

    When you have the leader of a political party who gave a speech in 2007 on the housing crisis,but who later steadfastly denied there was a crisis,then its crystal clear that there was a good deal of skullduggery going on during their time in govt.

     

    #1683372
    jens
    Member
    Member since: May 3, 2006
    Topics: 15
    Replies: 7641
    jens

    Yes lilith7, what you say is true, and National paid the price for its  blind faith  in  free market  “neoliberalism” by believing  freely  consumable tax reductions  may somehow generate more  capital  for house  construction  than the  same  money  converted directly into long  term (retirement)  investment capital  ownership  reserves  creation.

    But since  no government without huge  oil reserves has  unlimited  resources  for economically unprofitable investments  –

    the permanent housing of  people  at a permanent loss  may end  up  in a  worse  situation  than what we have now, when people  begin  not to care about  the need  for profitability, or even  prefer  to stay poor for  continuing  to  qualify –  or planning to  qualify  –   for  below cost  housing.

    The latter  is not “ideological  demagoguery”,  but  it  took our welfare state  of 70  years ago into  non-sustainability, and actually there  still are  cases  today  where  people  refuse to work full time in order to remain  qualified  for some  benefits.

    #1683373
    mommabear70
    Member
    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 1953
    mommabear70

    You got all that 100 per cent spot on jens.

     

    #1683427
    lilith7
    Member
    Member since: April 9, 2017
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 2029
    lilith7

    There’s a clear & long established precedent for govt housing here. It is not  impossible.

    Though of course,attitudes towards those needing govt. housing was once very different.

    “Those conditions gave the Labour Government – elected in 1935 – a mandate to make the provision of state housing a top priority. Then Minister of Housing Walter Nash told New Zealand it could not prosper or progress with a population that “lack the conditions necessary for a ‘home’ and ‘home life’, in the best and fullest meaning of those words“.

     

     

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=11346757

    The Great Depression of the 1920s and ’30s in New Zealand gave rise to desperate living conditions for many – widespread destitution led to people living in shacks and other substandard shelter; disease spread, and inner-city slums flourished.

    We again have children and their parents living in cars and sheds. We have thousands of homeless; old diseases and ingrained misery have returned as sections of the population struggle to keep pace with the rising cost of living.
    And at this critical juncture in our history, our Government is looking, instead, to offload state housing.

    It is hard to understand how reverting to the Victorian solution of seeing churches and social agencies haphazardly tackle this gaping social wound will work

    They are also not plugged into the bigger picture – the social needs of the tenants, the transport and logistics needs of new housing and so forth, all things a clever, committed government can oversee. Not ours then, which is trying desperately to shift the immediate costs of social housing elsewhere, and the benefits to a crony cohort.

    One method they’ve used is to seed the idea with the public that state housing is all let to gang members and chronic social misfits who trash their properties and refuse to move out. Of course, that does describe a percentage of state house tenants – or any tenants.

    Call me old-fashioned, but I tend to think that housing is one of the core concerns of Government, and that the provision of state housing – as well as its proper management and upkeep – is fundamental. It is astonishing that a Prime Minister who grew up in a state house, and has gained huge political advantage from being able to trumpet that fact, can’t see why it is wrong to pull up the ladder after him.”

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  aislingadmin. Reason: Updated links for security
    #1683444
    jens
    Member
    Member since: May 3, 2006
    Topics: 15
    Replies: 7641
    jens

    lilith7 – I cannot  find anything  wrong in  your elaborate posting above –

    except that regardless of all the  rights and wrongs –  you  (seem to?) ignore the reality, that   substantial state  investments  to house the poor  in an economically  unprofitable way  –

    becomes an increasingly impoverishing  burden  to the  whole nation the more  such  houses are  being built.

    If you accept that, we could discuss about what  could be  done  to  avoid  that.

    #1683450
    Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 49
    Replies: 11986
    Hero42

    Mommabear
    In relation to your post 1683250 we are talking about he same report but if you read my post carefully you will note I was referring to the number in Auckland whereas you are talking about the national average.

    It is important to make sure we are talking about the same thing to be accurate.

    In my opinion there is no point in viewing the national average when talking about foreign investment in housing as they will be interested in the prime real estate and not the low value rural real estate.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1683453
    Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 49
    Replies: 11986
    Hero42

    Mommabear
    I am not sure why you think the build at McLennon is not a Kiwbuild project unless you have overlooked the fact that the site became available for KiwiBuild after private developers were unable to finance purchasing the land and the development is now a Housing New Zealand led project.

    Any reference back to the earlier project is irrelevant as the plans for the new houses are different and the housing being built is affordable whereas the previous plans were for houses that were not affordable.

    Cheers 🙂

    #1683576
    mommabear70
    Member
    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 1953
    mommabear70

    hero42, I don’t know where you get your info from but the link on the McLennan development clearly says it was a Housing New Zealand from the outset, not later as you say.

    “A Housing New Zealand-led housing development in Auckland has ensured that home owners rather than investors get first dibs on its new homes.
    Work is about to begin on the second stage of 255 houses, where about 15 per cent will be social housing, either sold back to Housing New Zealand or to a community provider.
    Another 100 will be “affordable,” under $650,000. Those using the Government’s HomeStart Grant must stay in the house for a longer period of three years and be either a citizen or permanent resident.”

    If you have a look at https://www.hnzc.co.nz/housing-developments-and-programmes/auckland-housing-programme/auckland-housing-programme-homes/ it says of the around 600 new units, of which 150 will be affordable.

    I also have a recollection of Phil Twyford saying any houses built by or for HNZ would be over and above the 100,000 Kiwibuild units. Furthermore, elsewhere on the HNZ website it states “KiwiBuild programme is a separate Government initiative” which reiterates what I’ve said.

    #1683577
    mommabear70
    Member
    Member since: February 20, 2017
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 1953
    mommabear70

    hero42, “In my opinion there is no point in viewing the national average when talking about foreign investment in housing as they will be interested in the prime real estate and not the low value rural real estate.”
    I’m pretty sure the foreigners living in Queenstown, Hamilton, Canterbury, Wellington, Bay of Plenty, Invercargill, New Plymouth to name a few, would disagree with you.

    #1683613
    Hero42
    Member
    Member since: July 18, 2008
    Topics: 49
    Replies: 11986
    Hero42

    Mommabear
    The point about the McLennan development is that under the previous government the McLennan project failed to get any private investors, then under the new government the government used Kiwibuild funds to restart the project.

    Cheers 🙂

Viewing 10 posts - 381 through 390 (of 552 total)

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